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Paul Walker named Diamond W president

Solon, Ohio—Paul Walker has been named president of Diamond W, a flooring distributor located in City of Industry, Calif., that distributes Tarkett residential and commercial resilient products, effective October 7, 2019. He will be replacing Mike Klingele, who is retiring after 18 years of service to the company and nearly 50 years in the flooring industry, effective December 31, 2019.

Walker joins Tarkett from MeisterWerke, a German manufacturer of mid to high-end flooring in multiple product categories. Most recently, he served as general manager of the company’s North America business and was responsible for the development of market and product strategy targeting wholesale distribution and commercial/project segment with a multi-category product portfolio.

Prior to MeisterWerke, Walker served in a senior leadership role at HomerWood Premium Hardwood, a wholly owned subsidiary of Armstrong World Industries, Premier Flooring Solutions, a distributor of residential hardwood flooring products and Junckers Industries, one of Europe’s largest manufacturers of solid hardwood flooring for the residential, commercial and sports markets.

While retiring from his president role, Klingele will continue to support the business, serving in a part-time consulting role beginning the first of the year. In the interim, Klingele will play an integral role in supporting the new president of Diamond W during the transition period.

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Tarkett’s Tandus Centiva launches Tailored Twist collection

Solon, Ohio—Tarkett debuts Tandus Centiva’s Tailored Twist collection. This vibrant, carefully tailored modular carpet line combines inventive design with sustainability using the company’s ethos Modular with Omnicoat technology recycled PVB film backing.

“With Tailored Twist, we looked to the intricate stitching of a hand-tailored suit, that careful detailing that makes high fashion so special, and translated it into a modular carpet to create an intentional, tailored space,” said Terry Mowers, vice president of commercial design, Tarkett North America. “The four patterns within the collection allow designers to create individualistic spaces with adventurous use of color.”

Tailored Twist features the following four patterns that can be used individually or combined for a custom feel:

  • Tailored, the base style for the collection, provides a slightly larger scale print in grounding neutral tones.
  • Tailored Plaid features Tailored as the dominant style and a tartan pattern along the tile’s edge.
  • Tailored Bloom interprets a floral inspiration along the edge of Tailored tiles.
  • Tailored Madras is a value-engineered, mid-scale plaid in a palette that coordinates with Tailored.

Featuring 162 possible combinations in its palette and patterns, Tailored Twist offers complete personalization. The collection’s designers followed key principles of pattern mixing, scaling and coloring so every design feels whimsical but not erratic.

For more information, visit: tarkettna.com.

 

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CFI to hold 25th convention along with anniversary celebration

Forney, Texas—Certified Flooring Installer’s Association (CFI) will offer a “who’s who” stellar lineup of industry talent and business growth opportunities at its CFI Convention. The event will feature training seminars, hands-on workshops and presentations, and will be held from Aug. 15-17 at the Rosen Shingle Creek Resort in Orlando, Fla.

This year’s show will open with a welcome reception on the evening of Aug. 15, where attendees will be able to mingle with CFI trainers and presenters as well as representatives from many influential companies in the trade such as Gundlach, Measure Square, HPS Schönox and more. Thursday, Aug. 16, includes a jam-packed schedule starting with Josh McGinnis, business coach and consultant of Unlock Your Biz, who will speak about “Why Most Business Plans Are Worthless.”

In addition to multiple other showcases, workshops and new product demos, visitors will be the first to hear the unveiling of the anticipated research on The Installation Crisis by the FCLC. Thursday night will wrap with the CFI event night, including Florida’s very own Dale “The Paint Man” Henry and Band.

The last day of the show, Aug. 17, will include general sessions and additional opportunities to interface and train with some of the most recognizable names and faces in the industry, including Joe Cea of Congoleum, Don Styka of Tarkett and Paul Pleshek of NAFCT. The show will wrap up with the closing dinner awards, a semi-formal event.

“Along with our 25th anniversary celebration, this year’s show is going to be unlike any other industry-wide,” said Robert Varden, vice president, CFI. “Our convention is recognized as the number one trusted source destination for the latest information on new products, tools, techniques and training for the flooring professional.”

To register to attend the tradeshow portion or for full access to the whole convention, visit: cficonvention.org. Additionally, a room block with discounted rates is locked in for a limited time at the Rosen Shingle Creek Resort.

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NeoCon turns 50: Design, innovation take center stage at milestone event

By Lindsay Baillie

Chicago—NeoCon, one of the largest commercial interior design shows in North America, concluded its 50th edition last month, drawing in more than 50,000 attendees—a 5% increase from 2017. The Mart in Chicago was bursting with 140 showrooms, where roughly 350 exhibitors showcased the latest and greatest in corporate, hospitality, healthcare, education and retail design.

According to show management, the show floor was completely occupied, which was in keeping with NeoCon trends seen over the past 10 years. What’s more, flooring was the second highest represented commercial industry. “The fact that this was our 50th edition added a lot of buzz and energy,” said Byron Morton, vice president of leasing, NeoCon.

The scores of A&D professionals in attendance echoed those sentiments. “We could tell from the energetic crowds at The Mart that the excitement of NeoCon was at an all-time high this year,” said John Hopkins, principal and design director, IA Interiors Architects’ Chicago office. “We loved that there was such a focus on acoustic solutions—it’s an undervalued component when it comes to privacy, workplaces and open environments. We also noticed there were a lot of natural materials and finishes, a welcome return after the influx of the cold, industrial materials of the past few years.”

Angie Lee, AIA, IIDA, principal, design director-interiors, FXCollaborative Architects LLP, New York, agreed. “I have attended NeoCon for the last three years and continue to be impressed by the immense energy and creativity of the manufacturers, designers and associations. I saw a range of products implementing unexpected, thought-provoking uses of color, pattern and texture.”

Vendors attributed much of that enthusiasm to three primary factors—the strength of key end-use market sectors, the bevy of new products that provide both aesthetic and performance solutions, and positive trends in non-residential construction spending.

“Traditional hard surface markets like retail and healthcare still are very strong, and non-traditional markets such as offices and hospitality are shifting toward hard surfaces in many areas they did not consider before,” Robert Brockman, segment marketing manager, commercial, Armstrong Flooring, told FCNews.

LVT in particular is driving commercial flooring consumption across several end-use markets as it continues to exceed the growth of the once-dominant broadloom sector. This is especially the case in hotels. “Most hospitality end users are also looking to make a change to something more timeless in terms of pattern and color,” noted Al Boulogne, vice president, commercial resilient business, Mannington Commercial. “That, coupled with the easier maintenance requirements, make it an ideal product for these environments.”

But it’s not just hospitality that’s driving LVT specifications. Observers say healthcare holds the biggest growth potential for LVT, especially in areas such as hotel lobbies, hospital corridors and senior living spaces. “Slip/fall issues help LVT vs. other hard surface options,” said Paul Eanes, vice president of new business development, Metroflor.

Product trends
The vast array of innovative new products on display at the show reflected diverse requirements of architects, specifiers and designers. To keep up with demand, flooring manufacturers are developing new products across both hard and soft surface arenas that appeal to multiple commercial sectors at a time. In addition to developing products that fulfill “resi-mercial” demands, manufacturers are incorporating more pops of color to assist designers in creating unique, productive spaces.

In terms of hard surfaces, manufacturers continue to incorporate sustainable, biophilic design, with resilient flooring mimicking stone, cement, wood and other natural looks. Armstrong Flooring, for example, rolled out a heterogeneous sheet product called Mixers, which was inspired by the vibrant colors of different cocktails. Focused on its heterogeneous and homogeneous sheet lines, Armstrong presented attendees with new products that boast equal performance. “The update there is two fold,” Brockman stated, adding that designers can specify both sheet lines together without performance issues. “It’s not only new designs and patterns, but Diamond 10 technology has been added to the heterogeneous line.”

New to NeoCon, Cleo Contract—a Congoleum brand—highlighted its non-vinyl, non-PVC product. Made up of 85% limestone, Cleo has an ultra-low VOC, high-performance clear coating for durability and performance. What’s more, its visuals are digitally printed, which allows the company to produce custom looks. To help designers show what the product looks like after a complete install, Cleo Contract developed digitally printed papers that can be updated in real time with the current SKUs, according to Kurt Denman, chief marketing officer and executive vice president, sales, Congoleum.

Also riding the non-vinyl train is Mannington Commercial with its latest non-vinyl alternative resilient tile, Cirro. Offered in 20 visuals and four different sizes in tile and plank formats, Cirro can be installed using traditional resilient adhesives.

Also new from Mannington is Northern Wonders, which was inspired by a designer’s visit to see the Northern Lights. “Its colors and design are a culmination of ideas developed during the trip,” said Whitney LeGate, business manager, commercial LVT, Mannington. The product is available in nine colorways.

Over at the Karndean Designflooring space, the emphasis was on designer education as well as the seemingly endless options available through its Korlok, glue-down and loose-lay products. The company’s grout strips, available in 16 colors, were installed in the booth to show how to incorporate fake grout lines as well as pops of color to a SKU. “We’ve expanded our solid color offering to allow for both bold, saturated pops of colors and pastels to align with 2019 color forecasts, great for projects that require an elevated brand identity or to add a bit of whimsy,” said Jenne Ross, director of marketing. “We’re excited that these custom colors will be available on-demand and custom cut at our Pittsburgh facility.”

One of the products Raskin Industries showcased was Ceramix, a resilient tile with built-in grout lines that’s available in a variety of visuals, including stone, marble and concrete. “We have 36 x 36 tiles that give you a really clean smooth concrete look,” said Ted Rocha, vice president of sales. “It would be something that you’d see in an Apple store, for instance.”

Aspecta released its Aspecta 10 line, a premium multi-layer flooring with Isocore technology. The new offering features a 28mil wear layer and can be installed floating corner to corner—thanks in part to its innovative vertical locking system. “This is the Rolls Royce of multi-layer flooring,” said Marcel Kies, global CEO, Aspecta. “What we’ve tried to create is a good, better, best product.”

Shannon Specialty Floors displayed its new Naturescapes line, which was designed with the help of Jason McLennan, author, founder and creator of the Living Building Challenge. Naturescapes, he explained, is a resilient flooring product made with organic polymers. “It’s not vinyl, it’s free of all Red List chemicals and it’s the first Living Product Certified resilient flooring in the industry. This product class is highly sought after.”

Roppe highlighted multiple products at the show, including its Northern Parallels Chevron LVT planks available in a 9¼ x 59¼ format in three color ranges. According to Dee Dee Brickner, marketing manager, the line reflects strong demand for one of the most popular patterns—a directional pattern that’s often seen in real hardwood installations. “By offering a left and right design, these floors can also be laid in the same direction to create another unique look by using only one side.”

Looking beyond LVT, manufacturers in the rubber segment also looked to generate some buzz by showcasing products in on-trend, vibrant colors. Suitable for multiple applications, these manufacturers have developed customer cut and base profile programs to provide designers with greater options.

Then there was American Biltrite’s AB Pure, which features its signature Nfuse technology (Here, the coating that is applied directly into the flooring.) “Normally you would take [a rubber floor] out of the box, glue it down and then you’d scrub and clean it to release the mold agent,” Mark Tickle, director of marketing, explained. “With AB Pure, once you lay it down you use a damp mop on the surface. Then as soon as the adhesive has cured you can have people on it.”

Flexco is incorporating different wood-look visuals as well as new rubber plank sizes to its portfolio. “We’re also going to be launching some of our new base profiles, which is catching a lot of people’s interest,” said Haley Plank, marketing manager. “We’re also working on sustainability for our products. We have two new HPDs coming out for our rubber tile and treads.”

Procedo Flooring’s new Maxime rubber flooring line—available in eight colors in a 24 x 24 tile format—was designed to be installed across multiple settings, including educational facilities, sports facilities and retail areas. “We also started doing water jet cuts on the product for greater design options,” said Pierre Lefort, national sales manager.

All shapes and sizes
“Some of the coolest things in floor covering,” noted NeoCon’s Morton, “has to be the different shapes and textures” on display at the show. To that end, Tarkett showcased several products ranging from Pentagonals, which won a Best of NeoCon Gold, and Woven Fringe, a Best of NeoCon Platinum winner.

According to Terry Mowers, vice president chief creative officer, Pentagonals features rubber in a way that highlights a wide range of design possibilities. “You can get whatever color palettes you want within the system and a variety of shapes.”

Woven Fringe complements Tarkett’s rubber offering by providing a resi-mercial solution that is part of the company’s area rug program. According to Mowers, the product’s neutral color palette fits right in with current trends. “We’re seeing grays moving to healthcare in combination with other colorings. We’re also seeing grays getting warmer but we’re not seeing them move that far away.”

As hard surfaces continue to gain more share across various commercial markets, end users are incorporating more area rugs in their designs. At the same time, carpet tile is also gaining steam. New soft surfaces continue to follow sustainable, biophilic design while brightening up spaces with hints of color.

Case in point: Aquafil’s booth displayed clothing and carpet featuring Econyl fiber. According to Kathy Long, brand communications manager, the booth was designed to show how fashion and carpet flow together. “We’re trying to show the endless possibilities of Econyl,” Long said. “We have 28 new colors to the Econyl collection—new neutrals and pops.”

Patcraft highlighted Dichroic, a PET carpet tile made from recycled plastic bottles. “We’ve worked on two products to pull plastic waste out of the environment,” said Kieren Corcoran, director of performance markets. “We’ve taken the bottle chip that can’t be recycled and turned it into fibers. We can then recycle it again at the end of its life back into pellets.”

EF Contract, which made its NeoCon debut, highlighted several carpet collections, including Rust Dye. “What we did was take metals and went through the process of rust dying them and capturing what they leave behind as they decay,” Susan Curtis, vice president, design and marketing, explained. “We’re all about tile, skinny planks and giving the designer flexible to design their own patterns.”

New to Mannington’s broadloom products is Moire, a carpet tile offering developed in conjunction with installation artist Gabriel Dawe. Moire mimics an installation Dawe completed in The Mart, which featured 30 miles of colorful fiber organized in prism format. Interestingly, the installation changed its colors as attendees passed by.

Mohawk put the spotlight on several new soft surface offerings, including Sunweave, a collection of woven broadloom and rug products featuring Heathered Hues Duracolor premium nylon, and Crafted Convergence, which draws on influence from Native American pottery and baskets to everyday Japanese and African garments. “With Crafted Convergence, we’re starting to transfer more hospitality looks into the workplace,” said Mark Oliver, vice president, workplace and retail. “The other beauty is it’s broadloom, but we’re also offering it as a rug.”

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Resilient: In a contested field, sheet vinyl still competes on value, visuals

June 11/18, 2018: Volume 33, Issue 26

By Mara Bollettieri

 

There’s no denying that LVT and WPC have nipped some market share from sheet vinyl, but by no means is the workhorse subcategory down for the count. Although other resilient formats are growing in popularity, the product still has a place in the flooring industry today, offering benefits to residential and commercial markets.

Thanks to new technological enhancements and product design innovations, resilient sheet is showing it can hold its own against the onslaught of hard surface competition both within and outside the category.  “WPC is getting all the attention today, but sheet vinyl has been waterproof since long before WPC came on the market,” said Mary Katherine Dyczko-Riglin, product manager of residential sheet vinyl, Mannington.

Mannington is working to remind retailers and consumers of the many benefits of sheet vinyl, such as its durability and ease of maintenance. With the company’s Revive collection, it’s promoting these positive attributes while providing dealers with unique and on-trend visual options to make it more appealing to customers. Dyczko-Riglin also emphasized the affordability of the product as a key benefit. “The key to sheet’s success is to remind people that it has those great features and benefits,” she explained.

Other industry executives believe enforcement is the key. “We are continually reminding our customers of the advantages of sheet vinyl—installation ease, quiet, comfortable, durable, inexpensive and future flexibility,” said Liz Marcello, director of residential products–marketing, Tarkett. To that end, the company plans to launch a new sheet vinyl product, TruTEX, which has the ability to dissolve moisture and is mold and mildew resistant while providing strength. According to Marcello, with this new sheet vinyl product, Tarkett is hoping to “create more excitement” around this flooring category.

Mannington and Tarkett are not alone. IVC, a Mohawk brand, is doing its part to keep sheet top of mind. “The attributes of sheet vinyl, such as durability and waterproof features, all go hand in hand with still offering the most economic resilient product in the category,” said Amie Foster, senior product director, IVC U.S.

Suppliers are also leveraging sheet vinyl’s other attributes. “The versatility of sheet vinyl makes it an ideal solution for any number of residential, commercial and project-oriented applications,” said Kurt Denman, chief marketing officer and executive vice president of sales, Congoleum. “This multi-tasking capacity has allowed sheet vinyl to journey into builder, multi-family and residential-remodeling applications.”

Emphasis on design

Technological advancements have allowed manufacturers to deliver updated sheet vinyl looks that have more realistic visuals. Many suppliers are leveraging new printing techniques to deliver stylish visuals that today’s consumers demand.

“Sheet vinyl’s upgraded visuals and its competitive pricing make it a competitive flooring option,” said Clark Hodgkins, director of resilient, Shaw Floors. “This isn’t the dated vinyl sheet that once graced the kitchens and bathrooms of old.”

Advancements in printing technologies, according to Hodgkins, allow for new pattern creations and gives sheet the ability to better mimic popular visuals like wood and tile. He believes costumers can get beautiful visions at a “fraction of the cost,” compared to other resilient flooring. In particular, he cited Shaw’s DuraTru sheet line, which features realistic visuals.

Other manufacturers are also leveraging technology to render improved looks. “Products like Mannington’s sheet vinyl are highly styled with embossed-in-register, realistic visuals—in all constructions,” Dyczko-Riglin explained. “If you think about it, sheet vinyl is also the ultimate long and wide product as well.”

A case in point, according to Dyczko-Riglin, is Mannington’s Revive collection—a line that draws its inspiration from natural materials. “Revive patterns are inspired by popular porcelain looks, which are making consumers do a double-take,” she said. “It allows them to get the aesthetic they are looking for.”

Equally important as aesthetics, supplier say, are the performance advantages resilient sheet provides. This is particularly critical in situations where hygienic conditions are a major requirement, such as healthcare applications.

“Vinyl sheet floors are seamed by heat welding, which fuses the sheet together and creates strong, clean, aseptic seams that resist the penetration of dirt and moisture,” said Dave Bailey, associate product manager, Armstrong Flooring. “New material and coating technologies have enabled a wider range of colors and patterns, better wear resistance, reduced maintenance requirements and improved chemical and stain resistance.”

Like many products in its lineup, Armstrong’s sheet vinyl products have been enhanced with its signature Diamond 10 technology. According to Bailey, the technology boasts resistance to stains, scratches and scuffs while providing high-indentation performance.

IVC’s Foster feels sheet vinyl has the advantage in this regard. “Visuals continue to challenge the best LVTs, hardwoods and ceramic looks, so the consumer is getting an economic product with enhanced visuals.”

End-use applications

A majority of the suppliers told FCNews that an advantage of sheet vinyl is the product’s ease of installation. This attribute makes the product suitable for a range of applications and environments, be they residential or commercial.

Beauflor, for instance, is seeing its Blacktex fiberglass sheet vinyl being installed in the builder and property management segment. That’s due in no small measure to the product’s exclusive black-textile backing, which allows for loose lay installations up to 500 square feet. “Manufactured housing and RV markets love Beauflor’s sheet for our proprietary 16 foot, 4-inch width capability on a dimensional stable, cold-crack proof, waterproof and flexible construction,” said Michael Finelli, director of strategy, product and marketing.

Then there are products like Forbo’s Marmoleum, which is being installed across a range of both commercial and residential applications. “This USDA- certified, 100% bio-based product also fits the bill for sustainable-minded customers looking for healthy flooring options,” said Lori Lagana, marketing manager, Forbo Flooring. “It’s ideally suited for a variety of commercial and residential applications, ranging from patient rooms, classrooms, hallways and boutiques, to kitchens, bedrooms and family rooms.”

Tarkett’s Marcello sees its FiberFloor being used in multiple rooms in the home for single families. She believes it’s the ideal floor for kitchens, bathrooms, great rooms and/or laundry rooms. She also mentioned its usage in multifamily homes as well, where it is typically installed in spaces that see a lot of use and foot traffic. Also, when paired with its ProSheet Plus 3 product, Tarkett’s FiberFloor and TruTEX sheet vinyl products have the ability to be installed over existing floors. Since TruTEX is moisture resistant, along with being resistant to both mold and mildew, it works in areas that tend to get wet, such as basements, laundry rooms and bathrooms, Marcello added.

Mannington’s sheet vinyl, according to Dyczko-Riglin, is going down in wet areas such as kitchens, laundry rooms, mudrooms and bathrooms.

All of this is no surprise given the category’s waterproof attributes. Shaw Floors’ Hodgkins believes these qualities make sheet vinyl the go-to product for areas of the home that are prone to spills, messes or accidents. “Consumers don’t have to worry if their beloved pet tracks mud through the house or their children make a mess—Shaw’s DuraTru sheet vinyl will maintain its look and shape,” he explained. Shaw’s sheet goods, he noted, features OptiClean technology—an innovation that offers an extra boost of stain resistance.

But sheet vinyl is not just a utilitarian floor as far as installation, maintenance and upkeep are concerned. At the end of the day, proponents say, consumers will select the product because they love the way it looks, along with its suitability for a variety of installation scenarios.

“We’re seeing ArmorCore installed throughout a living space—including entryways and hallways—because of its visual continuity across multiple substrates and subfloor conditions,” Congoleum’s Denman said. He sees this as partly due to the trend of open-concept living in homes, and the continuity of a singular floor to “visually open up smaller spaces.”

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Starnet members host pre-NeoCon event

May 28/June 4, 2018: Volume 33, Issue 25

By Steven Feldman

New York—Three New York City-based Starnet commercial flooring contractors recently collaborated on a pre-NeoCon product showcase featuring about 10 Starnet vendors. Consolidated Carpet, Lane’s Floor Coverings & Interiors and Architectural Flooring Resource promoted the event, dubbed Inspiring Possibilities, which featured inspirational speaker John Maclean.

“The theme is twofold,” said Umberto Aponte, vice president of Lane’s, which spearheaded the event. “‘Inspiring’ is Maclean, and ‘possibilities’ is what Starnet and its contractors give the A&D community. Those possibilities include specification to post-installation, maintenance and everything in between throughout the continental U.S. and Hawaii.”

According to Aponte, the idea was born about a year ago at the Starnet spring meeting in San Diego, where Maclean was the keynote speaker. (Maclean is an Australian triathlete who was paralyzed in a bicycling accident when he was 22.) He subsequently became the first paraplegic to finish the Ironman World Championship and the first to swim the English Channel. In 2014, he completed the Nepean Triathlon without using a wheelchair after regaining some use of his legs through Ware K Tremor therapy. His story is one of perseverance, triumph and philanthropy to motivate others to bend their challenges into successes.

Lane Brettschneider, owner of Lane’s Floor Covering, came up with the idea to have an event in New York City with Maclean as the headliner. The idea was to get the Starnet Worldwide name further entrenched into the A&D community through a Starnet-driven event that could educate them on what Starnet members and vendors bring to the table.

About 140 members of the A&D community attended and took advantage of the opportunity to connect with higher-level executives from Starnet vendors, according to Aponte. Those that participated in the event included Tarkett, Johnsonite, Tandus Centiva, Gerflor, Milliken, Atlas, Masland, Mannington Commercial, HB Fuller and J+J.

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T&L Distributing opens new branch facility

Houston—T&L Distributing LLP has opened a full-service branch facility in North Little Rock, Ark., providing local delivery service for the state of Arkansas. This opening is in part due to T&L Distributing’s new relationship with Tarkett US.

T&L will represent Tarkett’s commercial and residential products including Johnsonite and Azrock, which will have local stock to service the business immediately. T&L will also represent Raskin Gorilla Floors LVT and Acrylix products, IVC sheet and LVT, Hemisphere and Heritage Hardwoods, and Hill Country Innovations Wood, LVT, Rigid Core and Ceramic in Arkansas.

T&L’s Pro Supply Store at the branch location stocks a full complement of tools and sundry products for the installation of all products including T&L’s newest manufacturer, Ardex and Henry’s adhesives.

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HD Expo: Hospitality takes its cues from residential design

May 14/21, 2018: Volume 33, Issue 24

By Steven Feldman

Las Vegas—Things are changing in hospitality. Guest rooms are moving more to hard service. Select service hotels—the 2- and 3-star properties—are growing and garnering more attention than luxury hotels. And technology is yielding better performing hardwood for public spaces.

“We are seeing a lot more mid-scale hotels, what they are calling select service, and a lot less of the 4- and 5-star hotels with the huge ballrooms and lobbies,” said John Reader, general manager, Desso Hospitality, a division of Tarkett. “That means there is a lot more emphasis on guest rooms, where the hotels make the money, and a lot less emphasis on the public space.”

As such, while the company is seeing much more traction in public spaces with hard surface and modular than, say, five years ago, the real growth is in select service. To that end, Desso showcased a patterned LVT to almost identically match a carpet tile. Collection Infinies by Tarkett is a high-definition LVT that invites users to customize four innovative designs with its proprietary co-creation tool. The technology allows users to select colors from a predetermined palette and personalize the patterns to their liking.

Talk to LVT suppliers, and they will attribute their increasing success in the hospitality segment to the product’s ability to provide solutions—whether it’s installation, maintenance or design flexibility. Take Karndean Designflooring, for example, which at HD Expo put the spotlight on Korlok, its entry into the rigid core arena. “It is increasing in popularity because of the fact it can go over imperfect subfloors,” Emil Mellow, director of public relations, told FCNews. “Someone just came by seeking to replace a ceramic tile floor with grout but didn’t want to rip it up. Korlok is a perfect solution because it will go right over it.”

Shaw Hospitality prides itself on offering different types of solutions for various types of spaces, according to John Crews, design manager, Lifestyles Studio, which includes the hospitality business. Among its centerpieces at HD Expo was Natural Choreography, a collaboration with Rockwell Group. Natural Choreography utilizes custom, end-cut block wood and sheared marble floor surfaces, which are signature interior elements for high-end hospitality projects. The patterns mimic natural stone and wood with “metal” inlay by creating high-definition scans of real lumber and stone. The idea is to bring these exclusive materials to mass hospitality as a unique, cost-effective solution. “We are taking natural elements and adding a twist,” Crews said. “It’s something a little different for public spaces and guest rooms.”

Republic Floors made its HD Expo debut with its patented Pure SPC, which the company claims is a step above what’s currently on the market. As Rotem Eylor, founder and CEO, explained, “Pure SPC offers a density of anywhere from 1200 psi to 2400 psi. It is made from four different stone powders with special polymers inside to make the material stable. Our claims ratio is less than 0.01%. The product is good in heat or cold, and it doesn’t need acclimation. It doesn’t expand and contract. For hospitality, it can go anywhere—public areas, guest rooms, even in the shower.”

Metroflor featured its Aspecta brand, which is finding favor in hotel guest rooms. Its Aspecta Ornamental line allows flexibility of design with a custom print overlay on a 2.5mm vinyl body. “It’s more of customized feel without a customized budget,” said Alan Rowell, director of sales, Aspecta. It allows a designer to create something beyond a monolithic design.”

Bringing past to present

Personalization of space and the need for a tactile experience—that’s what some of the carpet mills sought to address via their HD Expo introductions. “People are still craving the texture and experience to be able to connect with the product,” noted Jackie Detmer, vice president of design and product development, Mohawk Group, which features the Durkan brand for this segment. “Our new Crafted Convergence was inspired by a collaboration with the Museum of Indian Arts & Culture and the Museum of International Folk Art in Santa Fe, N.M. The carpet is modern but inspired by patterns that have been in [existence] for thousands of years.”

It was a similar story at Mannington Commercial, where Amanda Swindall, marketing director, talked about the continuation of personalization in design as well as what she called “resi-mercial” (making hospitality settings feel more like the comforts of home). In response to that trend, a new carpet tile called Heirloom, based on an old Czechoslovakian wedding dress, was previewed for a summer debut. “Look how the yarn comes in and out and how the color plays. It’s a handcrafted look that’s based on disintegration over time.”

Wood-strong

Hospitality is traditionally a segment that utilizes hardwood primarily in public spaces, but given the demands of the application, the wood must perform. In fact, hospitality is the No. 1 market for Nydree Flooring, whose products are acrylic infused, making them three to four times harder than regular wood, according to Jason Brubaker, vice president of sales and marketing. “Depending on the level of the property, our products could go in common areas, lobbies, restaurants and, in some cases, the guest rooms.”

Monarch came to HD Expo featuring its two main brands: Monarch Plank Hardwood Flooring, which is its quick-ship stocking collection, and Royal Custom Plank and Parquet, a wide array of unfinished offerings. According to Danny Harrington, vice president of marketing, Monarch’s products are suitable for hospitality applications due to a very heavy commercial finish, which features UV-cured oil.

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Tarkett partners with Sight Unseen for NYCxDESIGN OFFSITE show

Solon, Ohio—Tarkett will collaborate with Sight Unseen for the NYCxDESIGN OFFSITE show, May 17–20 at 201 Mulberry Street. The company’s flooring can be seen throughout the exhibit.

The exhibition is designed around Tandus Centiva’s Plexus Colour IV carpet in nine colorways: Lemon Peel, Purple Haze, Orange Julius, Glacier Bay, Concord Grape, Brushed Silver, Redwood and Great Lakes. Curators of the space are using the Tandus Centiva carpet to create color-blocked scenography to delineate each exhibition within the show.

The OFFSITE exhibition opens May 17 and runs through May 20. OFFSITE is an annual showcase of contemporary design by the best and brightest independent design studios and forward-thinking brands.

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My take: Catching up with a true entrepreneur

April 30/May 7, 2018: Volume 33, Issue 23

By Steven Feldman

 

You have to hand it to Thomas Trissl. Time never stands still with this man as he is always looking for the next big thing, always thinking about being innovative. So many people talk the talk; Trissl walks the walk. The consummate entrepreneur.

“Modesty, propriety can lead to notoriety, you could end up as the only one.” That line is from Sting’s Englishman in New York, but it is also this industry’s German in Florence, Ala.

I first met Trissl many moons ago—in 1996, actually—when he started Centiva, an LVT manufacturer/importer before the entire world was onto his game. Centiva was always different. Trissl designed the line; colors were vibrant and designs inspirational and unique. Focused exclusively on the commercial market, he sold to Tarkett in 2010.

Trissl resurfaced a few years ago with a different company, TMT America, which is billed as a company that provides capital and consulting for developing companies. Under that umbrella came HPS North America, the continent’s sales and marketing arm for German installation company Schönox. The company offers a number of products, but the flagship is something that can turn decrepit subfloors into something smooth and level, and ready for brand new flooring (see page 10).

Trissl is at it again with a couple of new ventures. I found myself in Florence last month and paid a visit to my friend, primarily to tour his Porsche museum (more on that later). Like a mad scientist showing an unsuspecting visitor his laboratory, Trissl gave me a glimpse into what’s next.

The ink was still not dry on a newly signed agreement with German ceramic manufacturer Buchtal and its American affiliate, DryTile North America, which introduced to the American market a loose-lay, non-adhesive ceramic tile. DryTile does not require thin-set materials and the agonizing task of finding good craftsmanship in a world where it is not only harder to find, but installation requires a flat, smooth subfloor. See the synergy with Schönox?

Another interesting concept on which TMT America is working is a heated floor system not for ambient heat, but for luxury foot comfort in residential settings. In residential settings, it will be a luxury item for barefoot walking, especially in bathrooms. The product can be easily installed under Schönox synthetic products. The synthetic product does not just transfer the heat, it actually boosts and retains the heat.

Finally, in the TMT sandbox, I was shown a 20 x 30 demo area that contained vibrant, colorful and enriched looking polished concrete. This is something in which Trissl engaged outside the Schönox involvement. He said he has invested a lot of time in this in his spare moments. Of course, Schönox will contribute by providing a world-new, two-binding-system technology which enables and supersedes a simple concrete topping.

HPS Schönox’s focus remains on providing subfloor solutions for all critical substrates. Now he is venturing into products that can capitalize on these solutions.

Eventually I made my way into what has to be one of this country’s greatest collections of Porsches, new and old. Some can best be described as collector’s items: 911s, Carreras, etc. Others could probably feed some Third World countries for a year. Colors are vibrant, each car with its own personality. Not surprisingly, Trissl has turned this into a business, too. Through Trissl Sports cars (trisslsportscars.com), he will find any Porsche model, any year, any color, for the Porsche enthusiast.

Finally, a business that doesn’t require a level subfloor.