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Crossville’s 2017 recycling program milestones

Crossville, Tenn.—Crossville Inc. has recycled 23,447,883 pounds of fired porcelain in 2017, bringing the company’s cumulative recycling total to more than 114 million pounds since the 2009 launch of the Tile Take-Back® program and subsequent TOTO USA recycling partnership.

 

These recycling initiatives are based on the company’s proprietary process for recycling fired porcelain products, including post-consumer materials. Through Tile Take-Back®, Crossville is able to recycle previously installed tile collected from its distribution network, as well as scraps that result from tile cutting during installation, sizing or sample creation. Through its TOTO partnership, Crossville receives pre-consumer fired porcelain toilets that do not meet quality standards. Prior to the partnership, these cast-offs were being sent to landfills for disposal, but now they are recycled for use in manufacturing new tile.

 

All 114 million-plus cumulative pounds of the recycled material Crossville has diverted from landfills have been or will be introduced into the tile production process. This use of recycled material during manufacturing results in Crossville maintaining its status as a net consumer of waste for a seventh consecutive year. Net waste consumption is achieved by using more waste than is created during production.

 

For more information about Crossville’s sustainability practices, visit crossvilleinc.com/sustainability/.

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CARE faces challenging climate for recycling

May 22/29, 2017: Volume 31, Issue 25

By Ken Ryan

 

Screen Shot 2017-05-30 at 11.38.01 AMSince its founding in 2002, members of the Carpet America Recovery Effort (CARE) have kept over 4.6 billion pounds of waste carpet out of landfills. To this day this non-profit organization charged with advancing market-based solutions for carpet recycling and landfill diversion continues to do good work.

However, CARE’s efforts have become more difficult as the price of oil has fallen. In 2016, CARE reported that its members diverted more than 488 million pounds of carpet from U.S. landfills in 2016, down nearly 6% from 2015.

According to Bob Peoples, executive director, 2016 was a challenging year for CARE in terms of marketplace activity and demand for various fiber types. “[Research] shows the carpet recycling industry is under mounting stress,” he said. “Until oil returns to greater than $70 per barrel, we see continuing turbulent times ahead.”

As of last week, West Texas Intermediate, a benchmark for crude oil, was at around $50 a barrel, and many experts see a range of $45 to $55 continuing for the next several months. The industry would need a significant and prolonged uptick before the recyclers can profit, experts say.

CARE is now facing pressure from the California Carpet Stewardship Program (CalRecycle) and could face fines into the millions of dollars, reports show.

According to Plastics Recycling Update, CalRecycle charges that the collection and recycling plans submitted by CARE have, for years, failed to meet state standards. In March, CalRecycle fined CARE millions of dollars, alleging past plans were insufficient. CARE requested a hearing to contest the fines. Instead of going after carpet wholesalers and retailers, as state law allows, CalRecycle is proposing to focus enforcement solely on manufacturers, the report said. The department has proposed requiring each manufacturer by Aug. 15 to indicate whether they want CARE to continue acting on their behalf, whether they want to join a different stewardship group or whether they will file their own plan. It has also proposed an Oct. 19 deadline to submit new plans.

During a May 16 meeting, Peoples told the CalRecycle staff he thinks the draft enforcement plan is a balanced and fair approach to an economically and technically challenging problem. After conferring with stakeholders, CARE will submit a new plan before the deadline, he said.

California is the only state to have a product stewardship law for carpet. All of CARE’s California Carpet Stewardship Program funding is derived from the carpet assessment charged to California consumers, currently $0.25 per square yard.

VPS program
During its 15th annual conference, held May 9-11 in Indianapolis, Ind., CARE announced the Carpet & Rug Institute (CRI) will continue to provide financial support of the Voluntary Product Stewardship (VPS) program. CARE has served as the stewardship organization for VPS, which assists sorters of post-consumer carpet diverted from the nation’s landfills. The commitment for 2017 is $4 million.

During the conference, CARE named its Person of the Year and Recycler of the Year for 2016. Dick Kruse, founder of Kruse Carpet Recycling in Indianapolis, was named CARE Person of the Year. Kruse, a board member, has been instrumental in developing CARE into the organization that it is today. “Over its 15-year life, CARE has been supported and enriched by a group of very distinguished individuals; Dick Kruse stands tall among them,” said Brendan McSheehy, board chair. “Dick has lent vision and wisdom. At the same time, he personally labored in the trenches of recycling, supporting his daughter Kasey as she grew and matured in the business. He is a shining example in a dark hour to our industry.”

Interface was honored as CARE’s 2016 Recycler of the Year. Back in 1994, Interface and company founder Ray Anderson adopted a bold vision that involved recycling and sustainability. Since then, Interface has been one of the industry leaders in recycling carpet. It became the first manufacturer to implement a process for the clean separation of carpet fiber from backing on modular carpet tiles. The program, ReEntry, began in 2007 and has processed millions of pounds of material.

“Many industries nowadays stand accused of greenwashing,” McSheehy said. “For some, the image and perception is, in fact, the reality. For others, commitment is barely skin deep. Yet, there are the few that take leadership roles in promoting recycling and disposal avoidance. Beyond this, there are even fewer that hold to that leadership through thick and thin. In the face of several years of reduced oil and virgin polymer pricing, Interface’s continued commitment has never been more challenging or more worthy of recognition as CARE Recycler of the Year.”

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CARE names 2016 award winners

Screen Shot 2017-05-16 at 11.51.37 AMIndianapolis—Carpet America Recovery Effort (CARE), the non-profit organization charged with advancing market-based solutions for carpet recycling and landfill diversion, has named Dick Kruse and Interface the organization’s Person of the Year and Recycler of the Year for 2016, respectively. The two honors were awarded during the organization’s 15th annual conference, held here on May 10-11.

Kruse is a member of CARE’s board of directors and founded Kruse Carpet Recycling in Indianapolis. He boasts many years of experience in the carpet recycling industry and has been instrumental in developing CARE into the organization it is today.

“Over its 15-year life, CARE has been supported and enriched by a group of very distinguished individuals,” Brendan McSheehy, CARE board chair, said while announcing the award. “Dick Kruse stands tall among them. Over his many years of service as a board director, Dick has lent vision and wisdom. At the same time, he personally labored in the trenches of recycling, supporting his daughter Kasey as she grew and matured in the business. Dick is a shining example in a dark hour to our industry.”

As a CARE partner, Interface’s founder Ray Anderson adopted a bold vision that involved recycling and sustainability in 1994. Since then, the company has been one of the industry leaders in recycling carpet.

Interface became the first manufacturer to implement a process for the clean separation of carpet fiber from backing on modular carpet tiles. The program, ReEntry, began in 2007 and has processed millions of pounds of material.

“Many industries nowadays stand accused of greenwashing,” said Brendan McSheehy, CARE’s chairman of the board. “For some, the image and perception is in fact the reality. For others, commitment is barely skin deep. Yet, there are the few that take leadership roles in promoting recycling and disposal avoidance. Beyond this, there are even fewer that hold to that leadership through thick and thin—and in the face of several years of reduced oil and virgin polymer pricing, Interface’s continued commitment has never been more challenging or more worthy of recognition as CARE Recycler of the Year.”

 

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CARE releases annual recycling report

May 8/15, 2017: Volume 31, Issue 24

Screen Shot 2017-05-15 at 2.11.10 PMIndianapolis—Members participating in the Carpet America Recovery Effort (CARE) program diverted more than 488 million pounds of carpet from U.S. landfills in 2016—down nearly 6% from 2015. That’s according to the group’s annual report, released at CARE’s 15th annual conference held here earlier this month.

Of the carpet diverted to recycling, 167 million pounds were recycled into carpet and other consumer products, 174 million pounds were sent back to the landfill, and 144 million pounds were sent to waste-to-energy and cement kilns.

Despite the impressive numbers, 2016 was a challenging year for CARE in terms of marketplace activity and demand for various fiber types. “Data shows the carpet recycling industry is under mounting stress,” said Dr. Robert Peoples, executive director. “Until oil returns to greater than $70 per barrel, we see continuing turbulent times ahead.”

Other highlights of the report: 72% of recycled post-consumer carpet is manufactured into plastics. This category has grown over the past few years. The amount of material recycled in carpet fiber dropped from 13% to 3%. Carpet backing remained constant at 8% of end products manufactured. Meanwhile, 11% of recycled post-consumer carpet pounds that were recycled went into new carpet. This is considered a true cradle-to-cradle process.

Screen Shot 2017-05-15 at 2.11.14 PMCarpet recycling employed 1,215 people in 2016. This is a decrease of 80 people or 6% vs. the jobs reported in 2015. To date, CARE members have kept over 4.6 billion pounds of waste carpet out of landfills since CARE was founded in 2002.

CARE continues to refine its survey methodology. It began using a mass balance approach in 2013. This methodology focuses material flows by examining inputs and outputs in each step of the recycling process.

CARE is a voluntary, non-profit organization dedicated to increasing the landfill diversion, reuse and recycling of waste carpet, through market-based solutions that benefit the economy as well as the environment at large.

For more information about CARE, visit carpetrecovery.org.

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Shaw releases 2015 sustainability report

Shaw CSR Cover-2015 Report med resDalton—Shaw Industries’ 2015 Sustainability Report released this week continues the company’s legacy of transparency through the disclosure of key metrics and progress against its goals.

The company’s 2030 sustainability goals include:

  • ŸReduce water intensity (per pound of finished product) by 50%
  • Decrease energy intensity by 40%
  • Reduce waste to landfills and hazardous waste by 100%
  • ŸDesign 100% of Shaw products to Cradle-to-Cradle protocols
  • Achieve an OSHA incident rate of zero
  • ŸReduce non-biogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions intensity by 40%

Shaw has reported its GHG performance since its inaugural annual sustainability report (covering calendar year 2008) and has formalized its commitment with a newly introduced 2030 target.

“Shaw is committed to continuous improvement and constantly driving innovation into our business based upon our perpetual quest for a deeper understanding of the needs of our customers, associates and communities,” said Vance Bell, Shaw chairman and CEO. “Our annual sustainability report reflects our progress and our continued investment in what our internal and external stakeholders deem most important.”

In addition to the new GHG goal, key items in the 2015 report include:

  • The company’s investment of nearly $300 million in capital expenditures, including strategic investments in multiple product categories and in automation, efficiency and technology advances in its operations
  • New calculation methods and baseline year for energy emissions and water intensity metrics that raise the bar for Shaw’s performance to align with industry standard reporting the company has been using as part of the Department of Energy’s Better Plants Program
  • Additional detail about Shaw’s investment in a new talent model as an innovation driver and key to long-term sustainability
  • Providing an average of almost 50 hours of training per associate for a total of more than one million training hours. These and other associate programs and benefits contributed to Shaw being recognized among Forbes’ America’s Best Employers 2015, Elearning magazine’s Learning100!, Training magazine’s Top 125 as well as being Great Places to Work certified.
  • Contributing more than 67,000 hours of volunteer time and more than $4.7 million to organizations that impact people’s lives in the communities where the company operates
  • The company’s ongoing commitment to a culture of inclusion, demonstrated through their investment in the Women’s Innovation Network (WiN), ShawVet, and unconscious bias education

“While we remain steadfastly focused on our 2030 goals, we are perpetually assessing whether they are reflective of our priorities and operations, that they are material for us and what matters most to our customers, associates and other stakeholders,” said Paul Murray, Shaw’s vice president of sustainability and environmental affairs. “We will continue to look for opportunities to listen and learn as we develop innovative products, processes and programs.”

Shaw’s sustainability report follows the Global Reporting Initiative framework and is third-party assured by Deloitte & Touche.

View Shaw’s 2015 Sustainability Report at https://shawinc.com/reports.

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Propex marks five years of Artis Modular Backing

Artis Anniversary GraphicDalton—Propex officials are marking the fifth anniversary of the launch of its first woven polyester primary modular carpet backing, Artis.

The backing system was introduced at NeoCon in 2011.

“Artis has been a huge success for us,” said Tom Borders, vice president, furnishings solutions, domestic. “It was, and still is, the first of its kind. Its popularity continues to grow.”

Artis was designed by Propex to provide all of the advantages of a non-woven and woven backing such as enhanced pattern clarity and definition, improved first quality throughput, and 85%-plus post-consumer PET recycled content.

“Since [2011], the company has introduced new innovation using its Artis technology, expanding new product lines to offer more advantages,” Borders continued. “Tufting on Artis has even enabled some of our customers to win design awards.”

Those interested in Artis should contact Propex by visiting propexglobal.com/Furnishing-Solutions/Product-Tour/ARTIS.

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CARE names recycler, persons of the year

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Jim Lindsey, center, Aquafil USA, accepts the Recycler of the Year award on the company’s behalf.

Dalton—The Carpet America Recovery Effort (CARE), which develops new processes, products, equipment and markets that reuse the valuable raw materials of post-consumer carpet, named Aquafil USA the CARE Recycler of the Year for Aquafil’s historic and continuous consumption of post-consumer nylon 6 carpet across the U.S.

Aquafil’s reclamation of post-consumer carpet is a first step in the Econyl Regeneration System, which creates recycled nylon 6 fibers from post-consumer carpet in a continuous production cycle. Aquafil’s process transforms the nylon 6 back into raw material without any loss of quality. 

“We are pleased to present Aquafil USA with this award, which recognizes Aquafil’s continuous commitment and leadership in sustainable manufacturing and a circular economy,” said Brendan McSheehy, chairman of the board, CARE.

Rocky Ponders, center, accepts his 2016 Person of the Year award.
Rocky Ponders, center, one of CARE’s 2016 Persons of the Year.
Rocky Ponders and Robert Goldberg, both of Columbia Recycling Corporation, were named CARE Persons of the Year. These two outstanding individuals transformed their company’s business model, expanding post-industrial and post-consumer carpet recycling over the past 36 years. As a result, they increased employment from fewer than 25 employees to more than 500 people. Ponders and Goldberg led the company’s growth into production of melt filtered pellets for the compounding industry and the production of carpet cushion manufacturing, using recycled carpet components.
“Over the years, these two innovators have led their company to divert significant amounts of carpet from landfills across the USA through innovations in process technology, equipment design and product development,” said Robert Peoples, executive director of CARE. “We especially want to recognize Rocky as he retires from the day-to-day operations of Columbia Recycling and wish him all the best in his new efforts to further develop the carpet cushion business.”
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Fuse Alliance reports 2014 Ecollect reclamation participation

94ba4287-7cdf-4d0e-b2f3-ec8a246dc00aLaguna Niguel, Calif—Fuse Alliance, a member-owned organization of professional, commercial flooring contractors, announced today that its members diverted more than 6.6 million pounds of carpet waste from landfills in 2014 through the organization’s Ecollect carpet reclamation program. With a focus on commercial reclamation, Fuse Alliance members increased recycling in this category by 2 million pounds, up significantly from 2013. Because commercial recycling and landfill diversion efforts can be challenging in this sector, the increase is a valid example that the Ecollect program has a positive impact on the organization’s sustainability goals.

“From the beginning, our goal has been simple: eliminate waste going to the landfills,” said Geoff Gordon, executive director of Fuse Alliance. “We have been promoting sustainable business practices throughout our organization since 2005, and we continue to focus on providing the support our members require in order to help us reach our goals.”

Through the organization’s Ecollect program, Fuse Alliance encourages its members to consider methods to reduce and eliminate waste and other non-valued processes that impact the environment throughout all projects and market segments. Since most landfill diversion has come from the residential sector, the organization has had a strong focus on reducing landfill waste that comes from commercial projects. As part of the services offered, the Ecollect reclamation program helps the network’s members analyze the processes for reclaiming product based on economical and environmental impact. As a result, members provide an informed, effective recommendation for reclaiming material, whether it is recycling, down-cycling or repurposing.

“In partnership with our members, we have shown that dedication and focus on diverting commercial carpet from the landfills can be accomplished,” said Ken Daniels, vice president at Fuse Alliance. “It’s a challenging task, but with a solutions-based approach, our network can help our commercial end users make the right choices when it comes to reclamation or reuse, depending on the project.”

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Starnet sets carpet recycling goal of 50M pounds

Screen Shot 2014-03-14 at 12.44.09 PMLancaster, Pa. — Starnet Worldwide Commercial Flooring Partnership’s Reclamation Program has established a goal of recycling 50 million pounds of reclaimed commercial carpet by 2015.

The program is in conjunction with Carpet America Recovery Effort (CARE,) which helps companies recycle their used carpets. 

Starnet will take care of the entire process—from removal to compliance to certification. The program can contribute to LEED accreditation on renovation projects.

Starnet said it will reclaim any type of commercial carpet anywhere in the country and ship it to dedicated reclamation centers, therefore bypassing landfills.

 Some fibers are recycled in a “closed loop” process that transforms used carpet fibers into brand new nylon carpet yarn. Other fibers and backings are recycled for use in new consumer and industrial parts or converted from waste to energy.
  
Starnet said its goal of reclaiming 50 million pounds of commercial carpet by 2015 is not a stretch and its environmental impact is measurable.

 Since the program began in 2006, Starnet has reclaimed 8,859,124 square yards of used carpet weighing nearly 40 million pounds.

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Beaulieu meets waste reduction goal

Beaulieu AmericaDalton—In its ongoing effort to reach a “landfill-free” status by the end of 2015, Beaulieu America announced a 30% waste reduction across all 22 of its facilities after just six months, according to Beth Randolph, director of risk management, who is heading up the program.

“This is Beaulieu’s commitment to being a good environmental neighbor by diverting waste through repurpose, reuse and recycle practices,” Randolph said. “Floor sweeps and other process waste are either reused in production or transferred to someone else who recycles it.” Continue reading Beaulieu meets waste reduction goal