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Ceramic: Next-gen digital printing technologies unlock tile’s potential

July 3/10: Volume 32, Issue 2

By Lindsay Baillie

 

Screen Shot 2017-07-10 at 3.26.15 PMDigital printing has helped to change the tile industry by providing manufacturers with limitless designs that mimic what is trending amongst consumers. Whether it’s natural stone, cement, marble, slate or wood looks, digital printing offers consumers the looks they want, the ability to put it where they want and at a desirable price range—all of which ultimately benefits the specialty retailer.

Case in point is Confindustria Ceramica, which finds digital printing to be one of the key technologies used in Italian ceramic tile production. “When it was first introduced, it could only guarantee satisfactory results for certain materials, but it can now be used successfully for any kind of product,” said Vittorio Borelli, chairman. “Its role has been further strengthened by the emergence of the second major innovation in ceramics, that of large-format panels and slabs, given that digital technology is essential for decorating these products.”

As technologies continue to advance, manufacturers from all over the globe are developing newer visuals and textures. Some of the newer design trends Barbara Haaksma, vice president of marketing Emser Tile, has noticed include Moroccan and Spanish looks, as well as antique visuals that mimic handmade tile. The main development she sees focuses on the manufacturer’s ability to customize products. “Another trend we’re seeing is the ability to create art on tile. Artists are now doing renderings and it’s being reproduced on tile. All of that is great to do now that the technology allows for it. I think in general we’re seeing a lot of customization.”

Haaksma explained that the new customizable features of tile are a bonus for specialty retailers, especially those who have designers or customers who want to create their own images. This trend lets tile take on higher-end looks with greater nuances, not only among tiles but customers as well.

Other tile manufacturers, such as Dal-Tile—the parent company of Marazzi, Daltile, American Olean and Ragno—are also creating more sophisticated products with the help of next-generation digital printing. “The evolution of printing technology has led to manufacturers being able to create unique patterns and designs on individual tiles, similar to the natural materials, like wood or stone, which we are replicating with high degrees of authenticity,” said Gianni Mattioli, executive vice president, product and marketing.

Part of Dal-Tile’s digital printing technology includes what the company calls “Reveal Imaging.” As Mattioli explained: “[It] is our state-of-the-art digital printing process that produces realistic color, detail and veining that is unique on every single tile for a look that’s virtually indistinguishable from natural stone. Digital printing technology is giving us—as well as other tile manufacturers—a competitive advantage over other flooring categories.”

Beyond the ability to recreate various designs and patterns is the ability of the new technologies to apply different materials to the tile. For example, the innovations at Crossville allow its digital printer to manufacture gloss, matte and luster glaze effects on its tiles, according to Craig Miller, R&D director.

Screen Shot 2017-07-10 at 3.26.40 PMMS International (MSI) is also incorporating newer printing technology that enables a quicker production process. “Digital printer manufacturing companies, such as Kerajet from Spain, recently developed an inkjet printer that will be able to apply both glaze and ink in one step,” said Paulo Pereira Jr., senior merchant porcelain. “Since these cutting-edge digital printers can apply both enamels and solids simultaneously—besides the basic graphic effect—products can also incorporate other effects such as metallic, shiny or anti-slip effects in the same, one-step application.”

In that same vein, advanced technologies employed at Emser Tile are allowing the manufacturer to incorporate ink-jet printing deeper into the surface. “It’s not just a print sitting on top of the surface, but it actually becomes ingrained into the bisque,” Haaksma said. “So then the patterns and the colors are now infused into the tile itself.”

Overall, newer printing technologies are allowing manufacturers to innovate throughout the entire production process. For Borelli, this includes “image acquisition techniques that allow for ever higher levels of definition; increasingly powerful graphic design software capable of processing the images; more precise and high-performance print heads; and the development of suitable ceramic glazes.”

Retailer benefits
While next-generation digital printing provides manufacturers with benefits, it ultimately helps specialty retailers sell tile product at higher margins, according to tile executives.

These new technologies are enabling the consolidation of flooring products including wood, laminates, natural stones, etc. “For specialty retailers the requirement for training their sales team goes down as product lines are consolidated,” MSI’s Pereira said. “In addition, it enables more individualism for customers in the design process as the amount of choice significantly increases.”

Screen Shot 2017-07-10 at 3.26.09 PMWith the help of digital printing, consumers can also get high-end looks and high-performance flooring—both of which are available through porcelain tile at a much more affordable price. One example of this is found in tile that resembles natural stone. “[Natural stone] continues to gain strength in the market, but it is not suitable for all applications,” Emser Tile’s Haaksma said. “So you can get the realistic stone look with the performance, durability and affordability of porcelain. This way you can put it in a kitchen countertop, or wet space where you wouldn’t usually want to put a stone.”

Higher margins are available to retailers courtesy of the attractive characteristics made possible through digitally printed tile. “These types of products are letting retailers expand their margin dollars by drawing more consumers to their showrooms to buy products that were once unimaginable for a typical homeowner,” Mattioli explained.

Homeowners, industry expert say, are often inspired by botique hotels, spas and hospitality spaces they encounter through traveling. “In the past, the durability concerns and price points of rare stones and marbles prevented many consumers from bringing these gorgeous high-end looks in their own homes,” Mattioli explained. “However, through Dal-Tile’s Reveal Imaging technology, our brands are able to offer the visuals of rare stones and marbles in a tile product. This lets consumers have the look they love with the performance that real-life activity and real life budgets demand.”

For Confindustria Ceramica’s Borelli, higher margins are attainable by comparing past and present products. “All you have to do is compare these products with those that were available just five years ago to appreciate the progress that has been made. But it is crucial for retailers to communicate this value to their customers so that they are prepared to pay a premium for ceramic products that stand out in terms of innovation, technology and technical characteristics.”

Digitally differentiating
Most digital printing technologies are not proprietary—meaning manufacturers are often using similar machinery to produce hundreds of different products. When it comes to differentiating digitally printed tile, most manufacturers keep a close eye on developing trends to extract key details that will be unique to their product lines.

Screen Shot 2017-07-10 at 3.26.04 PM“While digital decoration technology is capable of creating products with superior technical characteristics, it does mean the same plant solutions are being adopted across the entire Italian ceramic industry,” Borelli said. “What really sets companies apart is their stylistic choices, their use of graphic designs, colors and surface textures.”

Crossville aims to differentiate itself from other tile manufacturers by blending traditional printing technology and ceramic material effects with digitally printed images. “We call it a ‘digital-plus’ approach that allows us to create looks that are unique to Crossville products and are not replicable,” Miller explained.

For manufacturers such as Dal-Tile and its associate brands, differentiation comes from not only creating differing designs, but also from developing multiple products. “The vast array of tile offered by our brands provides every customer with a solution for every challenge they may face,” Mattioli explained.

 

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Dal-Tile re-launches family of brands

Screen Shot 2015-04-14 at 3.01.14 PMDallas—Dal-Tile has re-launched its family of brands: Daltile, American Olean, Marazzi and Ragno. After a year of intensive research, each of Dal-Tile’s brands has been repositioned within the marketplace.

“In the world of tile, it’s imperative not to blend into a sea of sameness, and that was the dominant driver behind the strategy of our brand development process,” said John Turner Jr., president of Dal-Tile. “We’ve worked diligently to differentiate Daltile, American Olean, Marazzi and Ragno from each other and from the competition. Our customers will notice there are no disruptive changes, but rather a dedicated focus on areas we know are vital to our success: brand identity, product availability, exceptional service, value to our customers and unmatched logistics.”

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Dal-Tile gets first EPD for ceramic tile category

daltile-industry-first-epd-north-america-fullDallas—Dal-Tile said it recently completed the Environmental Product Declaration (EPD) development process for all products manufactured in the company’s North American production facilities.

With third-party validation from PE International and certification by UL Environment, Dal-Tile is the first manufacturer in the ceramic tile category to voluntarily disclose cradle-to-grave impacts from its products—from Daltile, American Olean, Marazzi USA and Ragno brands—with UL Environment certified EPDs. Continue reading Dal-Tile gets first EPD for ceramic tile category

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Dal-Tile to build new tile manufacturing plant, distribution center in Tennessee

Screen Shot 2014-03-10 at 11.53.10 AMDallas — Dal-Tile announced plans to build a glazed porcelain and colorbody tile manufacturing plant and distribution center in Dickson, Tenn., near Nashville. The 1.4 million square foot plant is scheduled to open in late 2015 and will be the Dallas-based company’s 11th manufacturing facility in North America.

Dal-Tile president John Turner, Jr. announced the new plant at a news conference in Dickson with Mohawk Industries chairman and CEO Jeff Lorberbaum, Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam, and other state and local officials.

“We’re extremely pleased to further expand our manufacturing capability to Dickson and the state of Tennessee, which will grow our leading position within the industry to meet customer demand,” Turner said. “By partnering with Dickson County and Tennessee state officials, we were able to find a perfect match for our manufacturing expansion needs and continue to provide the exceptional service our customers require.”

Turner said the Dickson plant will utilize the latest advanced decoration technology, including its Reveal Imaging capability, to produce innovative and stylish ceramic tile products; the plant will also have the flexibility to produce larger format and plank format tiles marketed through its five leading brands in North America: Daltile, American Olean, Marazzi, Ragno and Mohawk. The five brands are sold through Dal-Tile’s three primary distribution channels: home centers, independent distributors and company-owned stores.

The Dickson plant will have glazed porcelain capabilities, as well as technology to meet the need of the commercial market through technical color body products, plus in-line rectification and polishing to meet market requirements.

Dal-Tile products are used throughout new residential construction, residential remodeling construction and commercial construction. In 2013, Mohawk completed its acquisition of The Marazzi Group, a global leader in ceramic tile with worldwide brand recognition and operations in the U.S., Europe and Russia. Marazzi’s U.S. operations were integrated into Dal-Tile in 2013.

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Marazzi added to Mohawk’s stable of venerable brands

Marazzi’s sprawling Dallas manufacturing site is one of the many assets included in the deal.

Deal creates world’s largest tile provider 

By Matthew Spieler

Volume 26/Number 17; January 7/14, 2013

HICKSVILLE, N.Y.—After much speculation, Mohawk Industries got a new “toy” for the holidays as the company announced its purchase of Italy’s Marazzi Group for approximately $1.5 billion.

During an investor conference call, Frank Boykin, Mohawk’s CFO, said the acquisition will be financed through a combination of cash, stock and
new financings. “We expect to use about $300 million in cash, $320 million
 in Mohawk stock and $900 million in new financings.” Continue reading Marazzi added to Mohawk’s stable of venerable brands