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Karndean Designflooring launches Van Gogh rigid core format

Export, Penn.–Karndean Designflooring now offers best-selling designs from its Van Gogh range in a rigid core format, in addition to the existing glue down luxury vinyl format.

According to the company, Van Gogh glue down provides homeowners with peace of mind that planks will be permanently adhered to the subfloor and allows them to personalize their floor by choosing the direction and pattern in which planks are laid. This format also allows for the addition of “design strips” to create an inlay border or shiplap effect. Alternatively, Van Gogh rigid core is a floating floor that clicks and locks into place without the use of adhesive. This format is the company’s quietest to walk on, ideal for upstairs rooms in the home where consumers wish to minimize noise transfer to rooms below.

“By offering these 14 colors in both glue down and rigid core, consumers can first choose a color that matches their space and then select the format that better suits their needs. Homeowners may even choose to use both formats throughout the home by enjoying the designability of our glue down planks on the ground level and the acoustic properties of rigid core in upper levels,” Larry Browder, chief sales & marketing officer, said.

With its textured emboss and replication of natural woods, Van Gogh continues to be a go-to range within the LVT sector. Popular favorites now available in rigid core include Reclaimed Maple, Aged Redwood, Country Oak and Vintage Pine. Van Gogh planks are sized 48 X 7, feature a 20-mil wear layer suitable for commercial applications.

Like all Karndean rigid core products, Van Gogh rigid core planks feature the company’s proprietary, 100% waterproof K-Core technology for installation over most existing hard floors, without the worry of exposing subfloor imperfections. With this technology, install teams can turn jobs quickly without the use of adhesive. Van Gogh rigid core also features an acoustic foam backing that does not promote the growth of mold, mildew and bacteria. Unlike cork backings, this layer will not flake apart on the job site. These planks are secured in place with a patented and proven click-locking mechanism.

Both formats are finished with K-Guard+ surface protection, which uses polyurethane technology to provide a hygienic and durable surface that, unlike aluminum oxide coatings, will not turn white if scratched or leave stress marks when handled. Both lines are backed by a 15-year commercial warranty and lifetime residential warranty.

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Al’s Column: The importance of proper substrate preparation

January 2/9, 2017: Volume 31, Number 15
By Scott Perron

Screen Shot 2016-07-15 at 3.49.34 PMRecently I wrote an article discussing the challenges with installing hardwood flooring or any other moisture-sensitive product on substrates that are ill prepared (FCNews Product Guide, Sept. 26/Oct. 3). I received several calls and emails, as well as a referral from a dealer in Montana to handle an installation that was challenged here in Florida. Most of the respondents wanted a little more information so I decided to write a follow-up.

As previously stated, it is of paramount importance to perform moisture testing on any substrate where you will be installing hard surface products regardless of type. Not only will this clearly set you apart from the vast majority of your competitors, but you will win the customer’s confidence when explaining the reasons for this test. Although our industry has produced many innovative products such as LVP, which is constructed using a waterproof core, moisture can still get trapped under this product causing mold or unwanted odor, leading to an unhappy customer. The same issue applies to laminate. Although moisture resistant in some cases, laminate flooring will also cause the same problem when installed over a concrete substrate that has not been moisture mitigated.

Following are some recent real-world examples. Back in October, our retail entity inspected three different claims installed by another firm that had failed due to moisture. Two were engineered wood floors and the other a 3.2mm click LVP that cupped and separated. Although the LVP was structurally sound, the odor coming from beneath the floor was unbearable. In the two wood cases the flooring was supplied by a very large national retailer that does not provide direct installation on their tickets, so the customers had no recourse without expensive litigation.

Perron
Scott Perron

A few months prior to that, I personally inspected a laminate floor that was floated over an engineered wood floor that had been glued down for many years in a large family room. The mere act of trapping the wood floor under the 12mm laminate did not allow the normal moisture to dissipate naturally and caused the floor to buckle and fail. Luckily, the laminate was still intact so we were able to remove the wood flooring, apply a moisture mitigation product and re-install the existing goods needing only two additional boxes of material for the boards that were damaged during removal.

Bottom line: Do your due diligence and moisture test every floor you install over concrete or even wood substrates you feel may be compromised. There are several products on the market that couple a moisture-mitigation product with an adhesive when installing wood flooring or other surfaces. Whichever product you choose, be sure to use products manufactured by the same company to avoid the proverbial “blame game” if there is a failure. Do not trust the warranties that are loosely described regarding 3-in-1 or 4-in-1 wood adhesives as these warranties clearly spell out what steps need to transpire at installation in order to be valid—most of which are not properly followed by the majority of installers. Any misstep will void the warranty and that does not bode well for you or your sales team.

Finally, I strongly recommend that your installers and salespeople attend any local or regional courses on proper floor preparation, as this knowledge will help you sell more product and higher profits with fewer claims.

Don’t be “wet behind the ears” when it comes to proper substrate preparation as these failures are always in the thousands or tens of thousands of dollars in potential exposure to the dealer.

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What’s happening in moldings

November 7/14, 2016: Volume 31, Number 11

By Lindsay Baillie

Moldings do much more than complement a flooring installation; they also provide valuable add-on opportunities for retailers. To that end, molding manufacturers are adapting to the changing trends within the flooring industry by creating products that coordinate with the bevy of new products, colors, styles and formats available today. Specifically, moldings manufacturers are employing advanced technology for color production and programs for inventory.

Following are highlights from some of the leading manufacturers.

Moldings Online
screen-shot-2016-11-11-at-11-27-08-amMoldings Online is currently in the final stages of developing Water Proof Core (WPC) flooring accessories. This new product is “perfect for WPC, LVT and LVP flooring lines, but can also be used with traditional hardwood,” said Angie Feldhege, marketing coordinator. “It provides high-performance durability with four layers of production, eliminates the chance of moisture absorption, is stainable and can be blended to virtually any flooring line—just like our traditional hardwood accessories.”

The WPC is created with quality materials that are combined using a thermoplastic, injection molding process. “Using our nanotechnology and ultraviolet curing process, the highly water-resistant finish and exclusive top coat is created,” Feldhege explained. “Its resilience against liquids creates a reliable barrier, shielding the entire product.”

Moldings Online’s new WPC line will make its debut at TISE 2017 in Las Vegas, Feldhege said.

Pennwood
screen-shot-2016-11-11-at-11-27-14-amPennwood’s focus on quality and color match can be seen in its RetroTread, which is designed to fit over original stairs and mimic original stair geometry. “For our RetroTreads we partnered with Young Manufacturing based in Kentucky,” said Kraig Coxon, executive vice president. “We buy their solid hardwood and then stain and finish it to match the floors.”

Quality is also seen in the company’s production cycle. “We control every aspect [of production] and we’re very particular,” Coxon said. “We take control of everything from the lumber all the way through to the box [the product is in]. It’s unique because we quality control everything.”

To date, Pennwood runs about 40 species of wood and about four thousand colors and stains. “We’re doing whatever we have to do to match the floors,” Coxon said. “Whatever the process is for the wood floors we will figure out how to do it for our moldings. We have the ability to produce exact patterns.”

Versatrim
screen-shot-2016-11-11-at-11-27-23-amVersatrim utilizes its Match All Floors program to coordinate its various moldings with major brand floors. “The Match All Floors program is where we approach [flooring] manufacturers and try to match [the colors of] their floors with our products,” said Tina Emery, office and sales manager. Manufacturers such as Beauflor, Happy Feet, Home Legend, IVC, Karndean, Mohawk and Shaw—to name a few—are already involved in this growing program. “Versatrim hopes to connect with more manufacturers at Surfaces,” Emery said.

Versatrim offers a variety of moldings to accompany applications for vinyl, laminate, engineered wood and solid wood. Its list of profiles includes two new PVC moldings for LVT floors and its standard laminate T-molding, reducer, end cap, stair nose, wall base and quarter round.

Seneca
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Seneca’s SignatureFlex, a flexible molding designed to help the flooring contractor tackle radius issues, is being billed as the only product of its kind. “Seneca supplies a very unique product to the industry,” said Mark Pacacha, national sales manager. “SignatureFlex is a polyurethane product that is proprietary. The polyurethane is poured into molds to manufacture the product. You can use gel stain or paint on the product and it can be used indoors and outdoors.”

SignatureFlex is available in a smooth and textured option, and is made in the U.S. It is water resistant and will not rot or swell, according to Seneca, and can be applied using adhesive, mastic or resin epoxy glue. SignatureFlex is designed for curved architecture and is available in 12-foot lengths and in straight or pre-curved styles. Custom profiles are also available when profiles for the mold are provided.

Pedross
screen-shot-2016-11-11-at-11-27-38-amOver the past couple of months Pedross has changed its production plant from Arkansas to the North Carolina/Virginia border. This move will allow the company to continue servicing the U.S. and Canada with daily shipments and inventory provisions for its partners. “The new production plant has much higher output capabilities,” said Daniel Oberrauch, general manager. “We grew very rapidly in the last three years and we had to look for a plant with a higher production output. We want to be proactive in order to better serve all of our current and future customers.”

In addition to the new plant, Oberrauch said the products the company offers help differentiate Pedross from other moldings companies. “We use solid core, which can be oak or other hardwood material,” he explained. “Then we put this wood through a scanner to determine its blemishes. After that we remove the blemishes, cut [the wood] into little pieces and finger joint them together with formaldehyde-free glue.” After the core is formed it is wrapped with real wood veneer.

Zamma
screen-shot-2016-11-11-at-11-28-07-amZamma’s newest product takes into account new trends in WPC. “We have just created a new line of PVC extrusions for the large WPC thick water-proof core flooring,” said Peter Spielman, president. “It seems the trend in WPC is going from 5 mm to 10 mm and possibly beyond. We’ve developed this product line to encompass those changes in WPC.”

Zamma also has a unique process to color match its products with top flooring brands. “On an exclusive basis we match top flooring manufacturers,” Spielman said. “[Manufacturers] supply us with the same decorative material that’s being used on their floors. We take the exact same layers of PVC on the floors—the top two layers, decorative and clear wear layer—and we thermally fuse in our facilities those two layers together.”

In addition to extruding its own products, Zamma also makes all of it own laminates for laminate flooring. “Every week we produce in the neighborhood of 2 million feet of product: wood, laminate and PVC.”

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Fall product preview: Tiles and sheet vinyl goods rolling out for back-to-school

As one of the strongest categories across the flooring industry, resilient producers are introducing a number of new collections and updates this fall. Focusing on a strong value proposition, stone and wood looks are the popular visuals, while easy installation features seem to be en vogue from a technical perspective.

Many companies are also introducing goods for the commercial side, or warranting performance with light commercial guarantees. With the residential market scraping along the bottom, suppliers are providing retailers with products that can yield the greatest profit at all points along the channel. Continue reading Fall product preview: Tiles and sheet vinyl goods rolling out for back-to-school