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Judge’s panel chosen for Schönox ‘worst subfloor’ contest

America Contest-2Florence, Ala. — Earlier this month HPS Schönox kicked off a Contest asking the question, Is your company working on a project that has what might be the worst subfloor in North America?  Today, the company announced who will judge the responses to that question.  Schönox put together the Worst Subfloor in North America Contest to shine a light on tough subfloor conditions, detail the best ways to renovate them, and provide some recognition and publicity for the companies who handle these challenging projects.  John McGrath (director, INSTALL), Lew Migliore (president, LGM and Associates Technical Flooring Services) and Jim Walker (CEO, International Certified Floorcovering Installers Association/CFI) will judge the contest after the entry end date of Dec. 15.

“I was delighted to sign on to judge the Worst Subfloor in North America Contest,” McGrath said.  “Any event designed to showcase the expertise of professional flooring companies and the challenges they face in the field is of special significance for me.”  The contest entries will be independently judged with first, second, and third place winners being awarded Schönox products based on the severity of the original subfloor’s condition, the skill and attention to detail taken in executing the project, and the quality of the finished subfloor.

“Installation companies and contractors face a wide range of subfloor challenges on a daily basis in the field,” Migliore said. “I’ve seen so many of those subfloor issues and see new ones each day; the Schönox Contest will likely show us even more.”  Those entering the contest are asked to photograph the subfloor conditions before and after the subfloor renovation project and submit the photos, along with some project information, at hpsubfloors.com/worstsubfloor where contest details can be found. Winners will be announced at Surfaces in 2015.

 

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Vinyl mystery spot

by Lew Migliore

The vinyl flooring pictured with this column was installed in a kitchen/dining area of a home and, as you can see, has a dull spot, which is in a very conspicuous location.

The homeowners said they noticed the spot the day of or day after installation, yet they did not file the complaint for two months. When questioned, the couple could not be certain when they noticed the spot. Continue reading Vinyl mystery spot

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Unusable flooring?

by Lew Migliore

A dealer who was obviously frustrated came to us seeking help, saying he had been told a certain percentage of prefinished wood in an average box is unusable or requires installer modification. Typically, and this is what he has been told by reps, “select” wood may have only 10% “scrap” and the percentage goes up with A, B and C grades until you have utility grade, which is all seconds. Continue reading Unusable flooring?

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I hear a sound

by Lew Migliore

A consumer is complaining about being able to hear the tenant above her in a condo complex even though a sound barrier was put in place.

Here are the details. This is a high-rise condo with tile flooring throughout in a tropical location. The substrate on which the tile is installed is concrete, which also acts as the ceiling of the condo below. The sound barrier is a cork product and meets the requirements for the application. Continue reading I hear a sound

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FCNews columnists at Surfaces

If you have not yet reviewed the 80-plus seminars, mini-sessions and workshops that comprise the Surfaces educational program, now is the time. Cosponsored by FCNews, the programs are divided among eight tracks focusing on today’s most relevant industry topics, including business, marketing and sales. Continue reading FCNews columnists at Surfaces

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Minor versus major floor prep

by Lew Migliore

The installation of any flooring material requires the subfloor or substrate to receive some type of preparation before the installation takes place. That could be as simple as acclimating the space to the appropriate temperature prescribed by the flooring manufacturer so the material is not shocked when it comes in contact with the substrate.

But the questions arise: What amount of floor prep should be done as part of the bid work for the installation? And, what amount is extra that would not be considered part of the standard practice for installing the flooring material? Continue reading Minor versus major floor prep

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Starnet Fall Membership Meeting: Moisture mitigation bubbles to surface

CHICAGO—Moisture. Generally speaking, it is the biggest enemy of flooring. Not so much the water spilling on the surface, rather the moisture that seeps through concrete substrates. In fact, it is one of, if not the leading cause of flooring failures, costing billions of dollars annually. And this is just on the commercial side where it is estimated 90% of litigation cases focus on water-related damages. This is the reason why Starnet devoted its entire Fall Membership Meeting to the topic. Continue reading Starnet Fall Membership Meeting: Moisture mitigation bubbles to surface