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Marketing Mastery: How to make 2017 a huge success

December 19/26, 2016: Volume 31, Issue 14

By Jim Augustus Armstrong

(Second of two parts)

 

Screen Shot 2016-08-29 at 3.50.37 PMI teach dealers a three-step system for achieving any goal in their business or personal lives. In Part I of this series I covered the first step, which is to clearly define your “big rocks,” the important goals you have for your business. I also gave readers an assignment to write down two or three big rocks they’d like to accomplish in 2017.

In the second and final part I will cover the next two steps you’ll need to accomplish your rocks.

Step No. 2: Practice time blocking. In my previous column I explained the importance of making time to accomplish your most important goals. A simple yet highly effective method for doing this is called time blocking. I’ve been using this strategy for years, and I’ve taught it to hundreds of dealers. How it works: Time blocking entails making appointments with yourself to accomplish your big rocks. First, decide how many hours per week you want to invest in accomplishing your big goals. For argument’s sake, let’s say it’s four hours. Open your company calendar and block out four hours in your schedule. It could be a single four-hour block, or you could break it up into four hour-long blocks.

Treat these as real, unbreakable appointments in much the same way as you would view a measure appointment for a $10,000 flooring sale—perhaps even more so. For instance, if you were with a prospect, bidding on a $10k wood job, would you accept phone calls, check emails, send texts or play on Facebook? Of course not. So don’t do it during your time blocks. Turn off your phone and emails. Hang a “do not disturb” sign on your door. Even better, do your time blocks offsite at a coffee shop or at home.

Step No. 3: Focus on results-producing tasks. Let’s say you’re currently working Monday through Friday, and that you spend Fridays working the sales floor. Let’s also say that one of your big rocks is, “I will take every Friday off by April 1.” You’ll likely have to put some things in place to enable you be able to take Fridays off, for example:

  • Hire a new salesperson
  • Train the new salesperson
  • Implement an “ups” system
  • Implement marketing to generate more prospects

For argument’s sake, let’s say you’ve time blocked Wednesdays from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. to work on this rock. What are you going to do during this time? Results-producing tasks are assignments that move you directly toward your big rock. In this example, you might dedicate your first time block to the results-producing task of creating a job description along with an ad to recruit a new salesperson. The next several time blocks might be spent developing a sales training initiative or identifying a turnkey sales program and implementing it into your business. (Disclosure: My company, Flooring Success Systems, has developed a turnkey sales system for dealers, so if you need help with this, contact my office for more information.)

Your next several time blocks would be devoted to implementing an ups system. Your final time blocks on this rock would be to implement marketing strategies.

This same process can be used on virtually any goal you set for your business. By following these three steps—defining your big rocks, time blocking and focusing results-producing tasks—you can make 2017 a great year.

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Marketing Mastery: Prioritizing social media marketing

July 4/11, 2016; Volume 30, Number 27

By Jim Augustus Armstrong

Screen Shot 2016-07-15 at 4.06.12 PMI was helping a flooring dealer prioritize her marketing program when she said, “I think I could be doing more with my Facebook page to generate sales; what do you suggest?” I am asked this in one form or another quite often, and the answer lies in how each individual dealer prioritizes his or her marketing.

My Flooring Warranty is a service that conducts ongoing polls of consumers who recently purchased flooring. One question on the survey is, “What prompted you to buy this time?” The top five answers are:

1.“A referral from one of your past customers.” (50.6%)

2.“I drove by your store.” (8.9%)

3.TV or radio ad (3.1%)

4.Social media (2.2%)

5.Internet search (2.1%)

A few people pointed out that some sales happen because consumers post on Facebook asking for referrals to good, trusted flooring dealers. You may assume these referrals count in the social media category but they do not. They should still be considered referrals from past customers because they would have happened even if the dealer had zero social media presence. Similarly, if someone emailed her personal contacts asking for a referral to a flooring dealer you wouldn’t attribute any resulting sales to email marketing.

If you dedicated time, energy and money to social media marketing and tripled the national average, you’d go from 2.2% of your sales coming from social media to 6.6%. Not bad, but hardly a game changer. However, if you dedicated time, energy and money to a referral marketing program and tripled the national average of 50.6%, you would transform your business.

Does this mean I’m against social media marketing? Heck no. I use it in my business, and my team and I teach dealers how to use it in their own organizations. The difference lies in how you prioritize social media; that’s where the three tiers of marketing come in. Let’s review:

Tier 1: Warm market

  • Referral marketing system
  • Sales closer system
  • Market to past customers (monthly direct-response newsletter)

Tier 2: Marketing to cold prospects

  • Social media
  • Google Ad Words
  • Search engine optimization (SEO)
  • Newspaper
  • Display ads
  • Direct mail to targeted list
  • Val Pak coupons

Tier 3: Broadcast advertising

  • Billboards
  • Radio
  • Television

You should first implement all tier 1 strategies. Once these are fully up and running, then implement tier 2. Once tiers 1 and 2 are in full effect, then you may choose to implement tier 3.   Use discretionary marketing dollars for tier 3. Comparatively, tier 1 is inexpensive to implement and get big results from, but tiers 2 and 3 become progressively more expensive and difficult to make profitable.

Most dealers spend the lion’s share of their time, energy and money in tiers 2 and 3; tier 1 is virtually ignored. If this describes you, you’re sitting atop an untapped goldmine of hidden profits.

I’ve seen dealers transform their businesses and, by extension, their lives for the better by making this shift to tier 1. I recommend you do the same so you can transform your business, too.

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Marketing Mastery: Industry leaders speak out

April 25/May 2, 2016; Volume 30, Number 22

By Jim Augustus Armstrong

(First of three parts)

Screen Shot 2016-04-28 at 1.02.14 PMI recently conducted a series of interviews with industry leaders on what they see successful retailers doing to grow their sales, keep margins up and beat the boxes. Pat Theis, vice president of sales and marketing for Herregan Distributors, was one participant who offered valuable insight.

What do you see successful dealers doing to keep margins up, grow sales and avoid competing on cheap price?

Not focusing on entry-level pricing but on one, two or three steps up from entry-level products. Instead of showing consumers low price, show them value. With the Internet and other competition, every dealer needs to give the consumer a reason to come into his store. Also, more successful dealers are keeping their products up to date.

Since the recession, successful dealers have realized they can’t count on walk-in traffic. They see that they must go out and get the business. They have to network in a networking group or by attending chamber of commerce events, establishing relationships with property management companies and realtors, etc.

How can dealers increase their referrals?

It boils down to trust. Consumers want to find someone they can believe in. No matter what flooring product the consumer is in the market for, she wants to find someone in her sphere who can refer her to a quality dealer with whom she can establish a rapport. Quality installation is a critical part of establishing trust as well.

What are your thoughts on developing repeat and referral business?

There’s a ton of opportunity in marketing for repeat and referral business by staying in contact with your past customers. A dealer should make a phone call after the installation to make sure the customer is happy; if there is a problem he should rectify it. Doing a post-installation follow-up visit or phone call is vital not only to get more business, but for a dealer’s own confirmation that the job is being done the way it should be. It also opens up that opportunity to get that low-hanging fruit in referrals.

What do you think about the importance of creating differentiation?

It’s what we have to do as distributors, manufacturers and retailers; it’s what we all have to do. If retailers don’t create that differentiation they just kind of blend into the background. Two of the most vital areas to create differentiation are with the salesperson and the installer. You have to create differentiation or you’re not giving consumers a reason to buy from you. You’re getting them to buy from you because you’re the lowest bidder and that’s not sustainable.

How good is the average dealer at creating differentiation?

Fair. We all like to think we can differentiate but it doesn’t matter what we think—it’s what the consumer thinks. And that’s why the post-installation follow-up visit or call is so important. Without that feedback you’re just kind of guessing.

How important is it to get away from selling on price?

It’s vital. Selling on cheap price is not sustainable. With most of the suppliers we deal with, their strength is not price but style and design. The reason Home Depot is successful with the cheap-price model is because it is built that way; the vast majority of flooring retailers are not. And you won’t be in business long if you do that. In my opinion that’s the difference between having a strong business and not being in business five to 10 years from now.

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Marketing Mastery: How to make more while working less

April 11/18, 2016; Volume 30, Number 21

By Jim Augustus Armstrong

(Third of three parts)

Screen Shot 2016-04-22 at 2.17.44 PMIn the third and final installment of this series I’m going to continue to discuss how Craig, a dealer from Florida, was able to cut his work hours significantly.

If you walk into any McDonald’s, the odds are you won’t see the owner in the back flipping burgers, taking orders, wiping down tables, bookkeeping or performing any of the other day-to-day tasks of running a burger joint. In fact, you probably will never see him. He is too busy pursuing other business opportunities like opening more McDonald’s franchises or jetting around on his ski boat. However, if you walk into the average flooring dealership there is an excellent chance the owner will be working the showroom, managing the warehouse, handling employee issues and generally running in 27 different directions with his hair on fire. And it is likely he is doing this 50 to 60 hours per week. So what is the difference between the McDonald’s owner and the average dealer? Systems.

McDonald’s and the 10-store dealership are system-dependent, which means the business runs on established processes even when the owner isn’t around. By contrast, the typical mom-and-pop dealership is owner-dependent; if the owner doesn’t show up every day, things start falling apart.

 

System-dependent dealership

Craig was able to cut his work hours because he transformed his business from owner-dependent to system-dependent. Following are the basic steps you can take when making this change.

First, make a list of all the day-to-day tasks you are personally handling. Next, create written, step-by-step instructions on how these tasks should be performed. (If it’s not written down it’s not a system, so make sure you write down the steps.) Then, delegate these tasks to different team members, training them on how to perform each task and holding them accountable.

You should have a written sales process with scripts and procedures. This should include how the prospect is greeted, how she is led into the sales process, how the in-home measure is scheduled and conducted, through how the sale is closed. I recommend weekly sales training to ensure each team member is following the steps. This is a good time to troubleshoot and refine your process.

All the steps after the sale is closed should also be outlined with detailed instructions and procedures for each process including ordering the product, tracking the shipment and delivery, scheduling the installation and following up with the customer.

 

Working on vs. in your business

Once your systems are in place and tasks are delegated to team members, your job shifts from doing tasks yourself to managing and refining the system. If a system breaks down, resist the urge to jump back in and do it yourself. Instead, fix the system. This is called “working on” rather than “working in” your business. Getting there is a process that can be done incrementally over a period of months.

Some of you might be thinking, “Wow, Jim, that seems like a lot of work.” It is. But what’s more work—implementing systems or spending your entire career working 50 to 60 hours a week?

Free book! For a complimentary copy of Jim’s new book, “How Floor Dealers Can Beat the Boxes and Escape the Cheap-Price Rat-Race of Doom Forever,” visit BeatTheBoxesToday.com.

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Marketing Mastery: How to make more while working less

March 14/21, 2016; Volume 30, Number 19

By Jim Augustus Armstrong

(First of three parts)

Screen Shot 2016-03-21 at 10.36.02 AM“I used to work 6 a.m. to dark, six to seven days a week,” a dealer, Craig, told me. “I was completely stressed out and feeling pretty miserable.” A lot of dealers can relate to Craig’s situation.

I want to share Craig’s story and how he eventually made changes in his business that allowed him to experience 50% annual growth two years in a row while at the same time drastically cutting his work hours. I’ll outline the sales and marketing strategies Craig used and describe the steps he took to cut his work hours.

Craig is a dealer from Florida who, like many other flooring retailers, grew up in the family business. He worked in every aspect of the business, from sweeping floors to warehouse work to selling and estimating. A few years ago he took over the store. “I became the owner,” he told me. “It was something I really wanted, but I found myself working more and more hours, nights and weekends. My wife and I hardly saw each other. And I was still doing all the jobs of an employee like selling and bookeeping, but I had all the additional responsibilities that go with owning a business.”

Working in his office late in the evening after everyone else had gone home, Craig found himself missing the days when he was an employee with regular hours and a steady paycheck. This is the situation many dealers find themselves in: the dream of owning their own businesses becomes a nightmare of stress, frustration and seemingly endless hours of work with no letup in sight. Some question their decision to go into business for themselves. Maybe you can relate.

In my opinion, the purpose of your business is to fund and facilitate your ideal lifestyle. Its fundamental purpose is to provide you with the money, time and freedom to have a great, fulfilling life outside of business hours. You work far too hard, and take on too much personal risk, to spend your life missing out on the rewards that should come with business ownership.

However, if the idea of making lots of money while at the same time having plenty of time off makes you feel guilty or selfish, then you’ll likely never make a start in that direction. I can tell you the most effective methods for achieving those things, but if you are queasy about having them for yourself then any methods I present will be useless to you. So your very first step is to get comfortable with this concept: The purpose of my business is to fund and facilitate my ideal lifestyle.

Craig was very comfortable with this idea, which is why in the first 12 months of implementing new marketing methods into his business his revenue increased by 50%, he no longer worked weekends, and he now showed up for work at 10:00 and left by 5:00 every day. “They don’t need me there anymore,” Craig told me, laughing. “I’m there because I want to be there, not because I have to be.” Over the next 12 months his revenue increased by another 50%, but his new work schedule stayed the same. He has put himself in the position where he can experience steady business growth, and even open multiple locations, while at the same time never increasing his personal workload.

Stay tuned; in part 2 I’m going to detail the marketing strategies Craig used to create this impressive growth.

Free book! For a complimentary copy of Jim’s new book, “How Floor Dealers Can Beat the Boxes and Escape the Cheap-Price Rat-Race of Doom Forever,” visit BeatTheBoxesToday.com.

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WFCA’s Humphrey to join upcoming FCNews webinar

March 14/21, 2016; Volume 30, Number 19

Hicksville, N.Y.—World Floor Covering Association (WFCA) CEO Scott Humphrey will be the guest expert joining the FCNews Marketing Mastery webinar on April 21, speaking on the six pillars of success for today’s competitive market.

Screen Shot 2016-03-21 at 9.42.20 AM

“Heavy competition from box stores and online discounters present significant challenges for flooring retailers,” said FCNews columnist Jim Armstrong, producer and co-host of the monthly webinars. “Dealers who don’t have an aggressive plan to overcome these challenges will find their businesses increasingly at risk. I’m excited to have Scott as our guest to speak on the six pillars topic. It’s a message retailers need to hear.”

Some of the points Humphrey will address include:

  • The results from the WFCA secret shopper research and what they mean for retailers.
  • An affordable strategy retailers can use to get a competitive edge over the box stores.
  • A simple step retailers can take to increase their market advantages in their towns.
  • How retailers can reduce their workloads and eliminate stress by using affordable tools formerly only available to box stores and other corporate giants.

There is no cost to attend the webinar. To register, visit market ingmasterywebinar.com/FCNews. To join a future webinar as a guest expert, call Armstrong at 877.887.5791.

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Marketing Mastery: How to triple your net profit in 87 days

February 1/8; Volume 30/Number 16

By Jim Augustus Armstrong

(Third of three parts)

Screen Shot 2016-02-08 at 2.53.25 PMIn part one of this series, I revealed how Craig Bendele, a dealer from Florida, increased his revenue 50% each year for the past two years while simultaneously cutting his work hours. In part two, I covered some of the strategies he used to achieve this impressive growth in revenue. Now I’m going to discuss how he was able to cut his work hours.

If you walk into any McDonald’s, the odds are you won’t see the owner in the back flipping burgers, taking orders, wiping down tables, bookkeeping or performing any of the other day-to-day tasks of running a burger joint. In fact, you probably will never see him. He is too busy either pursuing other business opportunities like opening more McDonald’s franchises or jetting around on his ski boat. However, if you walk into the average flooring dealership there is an excellent chance the owner will be working the showroom, managing the warehouse, handling employee issues and generally running in 27 different directions with his hair on fire. And it is likely he is doing this 50 to 60 hours per week, including weekends.

So what is the difference between the McDonald’s owner and the average dealer? Furthermore, what is the difference between a dealer who owns 10 stores (and can’t possibly spend 60-plus hours per week in each location) and the single-location dealer who can’t figure out how to stop working 60-plus hours per week? Systems.

McDonald’s and the 10-store dealership are system dependent, which means the business runs on systems even when the owner isn’t around. By contrast, the typical mom-and-pop dealership is owner dependent; if the owner doesn’t show up every day to babysit, things start falling apart.

System-dependent dealership

Bendele was able to cut his work hours because he transformed his business from owner dependent to system dependent. Following are the basic steps dealers should take when making this transformation.

First, make a list of all the day-to-day tasks you are personally handling. Next, create written, step-by-step instructions on how these tasks should be performed. If it’s not written down it’s not a system, so make sure you write down the steps. Then delegate these tasks to different team members, training them on how to perform each task and holding them accountable.

You should have a written sales process with scripts and procedures. This should include how the prospect is greeted, how she is led into the sales process, how the in-home measure is scheduled and conducted, and so forth until the sale is closed. I recommend weekly sales training to ensure each team member is following the steps.

All the steps after the sale is closed should also be outlined with detailed instructions and procedures for each step.

Working on vs. in your business

Once your systems are in place and tasks are delegated to team members, your job shifts from doing tasks yourself to managing and refining the system. If a system breaks down, resist the urge to jump back in and do it yourself. Instead, fix the system. This is called working “on” rather than “in” your business. Getting there is a process that can be done a little at a time over a period of months.

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Marketing Mastery: How to triple your net profit in 87 days

Jan 4/11; Volume 30/Number 14

By Jim Augustus Armstrong

(First of three parts)

Screen Shot 2016-01-18 at 3.43.07 PMIn this series you will learn how one dealer transformed the effectiveness of his sales team and quickly tripled his net profit. Part one will focus on the case study of a particular dealer, while parts two and three will delve into the specifics of how you can quickly implement this kind of system into your own business.

One challenge dealers often face is finding salespeople with experience in the flooring industry. If none are to be found, dealers must hire salespeople without experience, which means having to train them for many months before they become producers for the business. And what happens after all that hard work? The salesperson might quit or go to work for a competitor. What if there is a better way? What if you could get a total “newbie” salesperson producing large revenue for your business in just a few weeks? A step-by-step sales closer system can make that happen.

Daniel Knigge works as a salesperson for Russ Bundy’s flooring business in Utah. Daniel had very little experience in the flooring business when he began using a sales closer system.

“I started working in the flooring business only six months ago,” Daniel told me. “My residential margins were 30% to 35%. It was emotionally stressful. I would end the day, be totally exhausted and realize I hadn’t closed any sales. It was discouraging.” To make matters worse, he works right down the street from two major home centers. “People would come in and say, ‘Lowe’s quoted me this price,’ or ‘Home Depot quoted me such and such,’” he said. “I constantly had to compete on price.”

Things changed when he switched to using a sales closer system. “I closed the first seven out of seven people,” he continued. “Since then my overall close ratio has averaged 85%. My residential margins are now averaging 40%.”

I asked Russ how it feels to have a system that he can turn over to a completely new, never-worked-in-the-flooring-business-before salesperson and have him immediately begin generating these kinds of margins and close ratios. “It’s pretty amazing and gives me a lot of hope about building my business,” Russ said. “In the past I felt like it was really hard to bring someone new in. It takes a couple of years to get them fully trained. What if during that time they aren’t successful, they don’t generate enough money and you have to start over from scratch? So to be able to put somebody into a system takes a lot of pressure off of me from needing to teach them everything about how to close a sale.”

He went on to say that hiring a new salesperson is always stressful. “I think other dealers can relate to this. You can bring in a good person but if you put them into a bad sales system, they might not last very long. But you can bring a mediocre person in and put them in the right system, and even they can be successful.”

Within 87 days of implementing a purposeful sales system, Russ’ year-over-year revenue was up 13% but the increase in his net profit is what is truly impressive. “We’re also getting higher margins,” he said. “So even though we cut all of our advertising efforts, our net profits have tripled.”

Raising his margins to a 40% average—up from 30% to 35%—meant that Russ was able to bank all that extra money which he had previously left on the table. It was basically pure profit, which is why a seemingly modest margin increase can exponentially boost your net profit and vice versa; cutting your margins by 5% can devastate your net profit.

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Marketing Mastery: How to triple your net profit in 87 days

Jan 18/25; Volume 30/Number 15

By Jim Augustus Armstrong

(Second of three parts)

Screen Shot 2016-01-18 at 1.45.48 PMIn part one of this series I explained how Russ Bundy, a dealer from Utah, quickly skyrocketed his net profit by implementing a sales closer system. Here are the specific details of this kind of sales process.

First I’d like to remind you of the importance of adopting new sales and marketing strategies. Even those of you who are hesitant must admit that big box stores and online discounters are stealing more and more of the flooring market from local retailers, and this problem is only getting worse. In fact, I recently spoke with Scott Humphrey, CEO of the World Floor Covering Association (WFCA), who told me the concern over this issue is such that the WFCA focuses much of its efforts on helping dealers to “beat the boxes.”

Dealers who don’t have a plan to overcome this problem are going to see their margins squeezed and the need to work harder to make less. If you insist on sticking to old methods that may have worked in the past, you are ultimately putting your business at risk. However, if you have an impactful sales closer system in place, you will take a step toward solving the problem of box store threats.

 

The pattern interrupt

When a potential customer walks into your store, instead of saying, “How may I help you?” you should create a pattern interrupt by saying, “Hi, welcome to Jimbo’s Floors. Are you a new or returning client?” If she is new, you should continue by saying, “Great! We have a special program for new clients. Can I take a quick minute and tell you about it?” If she’s a returning client, then say, “Great! We have a special program for returning clients.” By doing this you are creating total differentiation and getting her out of the “I’m just looking” mode. You also just bought yourself 30 seconds to sit down and talk.

Wow the client

After she sits down with you, hand her a beverage menu and say, “What can I get you to drink?” Not only does this serve as a wow factor, but by giving her a gift she will want to reciprocate. This will make her more willing to let you do an in-home measure.

Social proof

While the customer is in your store, make sure she sees testimonials from clients in addition to before-and-after photos of your projects.

Diagnose her problem

When you visit your doctor, he doesn’t burst into the room and say, “Hey, we’re having a 70% off sale on all antibiotics!” Instead he sits down, asks you questions and then writes out a prescription based on your needs. You should do the same with your client. Ask lots of questions and write down the answers.

Be sure to include target questions that allow you to easily close the sale. Some examples include: “What’s important about new flooring to you? What did you like about the last installation you had done? What didn’t you like? What do you like about your current flooring? What don’t you like? What can we do to exceed your expectations?”

Listen carefully to the answers because she is going to hand you the keys to the sale. For example, if she hated the last installation because the store didn’t call her back, you can sell her on your prompt return call guarantee.

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Marketing Mastery: Eliminate the ‘feast or famine’ cycle

October 12/19; Volume 30/Number 8

By Jim Augustus Armstrong

(First of three parts)

Screen Shot 2015-09-03 at 4.47.43 PMBusiness is slow, so you launch advertising campaigns and promotions and work your tail off, hustling to get more traffic through your door. The next thing you know you’re so swamped you can’t keep up with the orders. You stop doing the things that brought in those customers because you’re so busy running around putting out fires. Now you’re stressed out, working nights and weekends. Your spouse files a missing persons report. You have to pull up photos on your smartphone to remind yourself what your kids look like. You wish for a break.

Then your wish comes true and you get a nice, long break because your customers vanish like a burp in the breeze. Your showroom is as quiet as a graveyard at midnight. This calm feeling turns into panic. Once again you launch promotions and start hustling to get new business.

Does this sound familiar? This is a common state of affairs for many dealers because most have set up their businesses in such a way that they are forced to ride this nauseating up-and-down rollercoaster.

These dealers don’t have an ongoing, dependable marketing system in place to create a steady stream of customers, balance the ups and downs, and bulletproof the business against market downturns. They don’t have a delegation system in place, which translates to a spike in their personal workloads whenever there is a spike in business. They work longer hours, nights and weekends, and run around with their hair on fire trying to handle it all themselves until the spike turns into a dip. Then they panic from the lack of business.

Ironically, an improving economy can make this problem worse. When the economy picks up, rather than leverage this into a permanently higher level of revenue, most dealers burn themselves out trying to stay caught up and then sink back to their old revenue level once the boom is over. There is no permanent gain. This is because most dealers do not own their businesses; the businesses own them.

This problem isn’t eliminated simply because a dealer generates millions of dollars in revenue. I worked with a retailer who made several million dollars annually and paid himself a personal salary of $400,000. But he worked six to seven days a week, never took vacations, rarely spent time with his two daughters and was totally burnt out. In spite of having a generous income, the business still owned him. He was what I refer to as a “successful slave.” Within three coaching calls I showed him how to reduce his workload to 40 hours per week or less (no weekends) and take time away from the business. That year he took his daughters on a vacation to Disney World.

In other words, in order to become a successful dealer with an ideal business as well as an ideal lifestyle, generating more money is important but it’s only half the recipe for success. You’ve got to have systems in place that create freedom for you so you can enjoy that extra money. Again, it is the difference between owning your business and your business owning you.

So how can a dealer leverage seasonal ups and downs or an overall improvement in the economy into a permanently higher level of revenue? I’ll cover that in detail in part two.

For in-depth training on eliminating the “feast or famine” cycle, be sure to attend the Retail Profit Explosion Boot Camp on Nov. 5 at The International Surface Event (TISE) East in Orlando. For a sneak peak video, visit JimInFlorida.com.