Posted on

Installation: Today’s adhesives in lockstep with ‘green’ flooring trends

November 6/13, 2017: Volume 32, Issue 11

By Lindsay Baillie

 

As more floor covering manufacturers embrace environmentally friendly practices in the development of their products, producers of adhesives and installation materials are following suit. Many of today’s green glues tout key attributes such as low-to-zero VOCs, are solvent free and are indoor air quality certified to high standards, thereby contributing to LEED. These qualities are beneficial to not only the end user and the environment but also the installers who handle the products on a daily basis.

Following is a sampling of some of the latest green adhesives.

Bonstone
Screen Shot 2017-11-13 at 10.36.35 AM
Touchstone T-2000 is one of Bonstone’s top adhesives for floor and wall tile installations. In addition to exceeding ANSI-A-118.3 requirement, Touchstone T-2000 is chemical resistant, has low VOCs and offers a long open time.

“Our products are designed for permanent installations,” said Mike Beckmann, president. “They are structural products designed to last as long as the lifetime of the substrate. So, if you are installing a countertop, a floor or wall tile, or restoring a building or monument, the adhesive will last as long as the lifetime of the structure.”

Touchstone T-2000, a 100% epoxy, has exceptional strength, durability, adhesion, temperature resistance and chemical resistance. These properties make them suitable for aggressive installations, such as breweries, dairies, wineries, etc., where frequent steam-cleaning is necessary to maintain hygienic conditions.

Screen Shot 2017-11-13 at 10.36.42 AMDriTac
DriTac 7800 Supreme Green is DriTac’s latest multi-functional adhesive solution for the wood flooring industry. It is a single-component, premium green sound and moisture control hybrid polymer wood flooring adhesive that can serve to isolate old cutback adhesive residue and suppress concrete subfloor cracks. Supreme Green provides unlimited subfloor moisture control with no testing required and a lifetime warranty.

DriTac 7800 contains zero isocyanates, zero VOCs, zero solvents and has been independently tested and certified by CRI for indoor air quality. Supreme Green is manufactured in the USA and can be used to install multi-ply engineered plank, solid wood plank, bamboo flooring and more.

“This is the very first wood flooring adhesive that boasts five installation solutions in one pail, allowing retailers to now stock one SKU in place of the several required in the past,” said John Lio, vice president of marketing. “Requiring effortless cleaning—wet or dry—off the surface of hardwood flooring, this flooring installation solution provides value for installers, retailers and their customers.”

DriTac offers a full-line of wood and resilient flooring adhesives certified by CRI’s Green Label Plus program. The company manufactures all of its adhesives in compliance with all mandated regulations and requirements at the federal, state and local levels.

Screen Shot 2017-11-13 at 10.36.48 AMSchönox
Schönox Emiclassic can be used with interior floor and wall products including vinyl, linoleum, rubber, impact sound insulation underlayment, carpet, needle felt and PVC. It is resistant to moisture as high as 90% RH or 9 lbs., covers up to 850 square feet with one 4-gallon pail and is easily applied with a notch trowel or roller.

Emiclassic can be installed over absorbent and non-absorbent substrates. What’s more, it allows the installer to control the tack of the glue changing from wet, tacky and pressure-sensitive installation with short waiting times between 10-60 minutes. Its alkaline-resistant technology also makes the adhesive “Ph irrelevant,” the company stated.

Due to its very low emissions (EC 1PLUS, EPD and FloorScore certified), low odor and solvent free characteristics, Schönox Emiclassic is safer for the health of the labor force, the end user and the environment.

Screen Shot 2017-11-13 at 10.36.55 AMHenry
New to Henry, an Ardex Americas brand, is Henry 622 vinyl bond premium high strength vinyl flooring adhesive is a certified bio-based product. It’s an ideal adhesive for environmentally conscious installers who are working with LVT-type products. Henry 622, which features the company’s GreenLine logo, boasts environmentally friendly technology designed to meet or exceed industry and governmental regulations. All Henry adhesives with the GreenLine logo have ultra-low VOC emissions, low or no odor and contributions to LEED.

“At Henry being green isn’t just a slogan, it’s part of our culture,” said Ed Masilunas, Henry business manager. “We’re committed to minimalizing our environmental footprint throughout the manufacturing process, including the use of sustainable materials, recyclable packaging and less residual waste.”

Screen Shot 2017-11-13 at 10.37.07 AMUzin
Uzin, a UFloor brand, now offers KE 66, a premium, fiber-reinforced, wet set adhesive, designed for the installation of vinyl and rubber flooring on porous substrates. This hard-setting, high shear strength adhesive has excellent resistance to indentations and shrinkage and is effective in areas where rolling loads and furniture are in use.

Uzin KE 66 meets the strict GEV-Emicode EC 1 Plus criteria for indoor emissions testing. GEV is the European testing agency Association for the Control of Emissions in Products for Flooring Installation, Adhesives and Building Materials. GEV’s stringent standards are recognized internationally as the highest level of indoor air quality protection. KE 66, a LEED v4 contributing product, meets the rigorous California Sect. 01350 standard as well as meets the SCAQMD rule 1168 with less than 30g/l VOC.

Posted on

Living Product Expo: Tarkett pushes boundaries of sustainable building

October 9/16, 2017: Volume 32, Issue 9

By Ken Ryan

 

Screen Shot 2017-10-17 at 9.43.16 AMPittsburgh—There are flooring companies that like to stake their claim to the “green” label when, in reality, their products mostly meet baseline certification for sustainability. And then there are those few companies that take responsible manufacturing to an entirely different plane.

That short list includes Tarkett.

From eco-design and installation to recycling and reuse, Tarkett has demonstrated over decades a commitment to continuously developing products with the planet and people in mind.

Tarkett North America has applied cradle-to-cradle principles to product development since 2011 and today holds more product and material certifications (175) than all other flooring manufacturers. “Having so many products and materials cradle-to-cradle certified demonstrates our commitment to both the built environment and the planet as a whole,” said Diane Martel, vice president of environmental planning and strategy for Tarkett North America.

Martel was a presenter at the Living Product Expo in Pittsburgh in September. She took part in a seminar titled: “Can PVC be made into a Living Product?” PVC, which is used in most manufacturing of vinyl flooring, has several advantages, including low cost and ease of replacing individual tiles. However, PVC is not inherently green, experts say. In fact, it has been called “the poison plastic” because the emissions from PVC—at certain levels—can create health hazards such as dioxins and furans, two of the most toxic chemicals on the planet.

During the discussion, Martel argued that PVC could be a sustainable product if done responsibly. “It’s about cleaning up the chemistry of PVC. We’re taking other people’s wastage streams and finding potential use for it. PVC is extremely easy to recycle. We should be closing the loop on PVC.”

By “we” she means the flooring industry at large. Tarkett wants to work with other companies to find solutions that will benefit the planet. “We can only solve this if we collaborate and people adhere to something that is actionable and reasonable,” Martel explained. “We find that opening the door to collaboration and cooperation is really the path to take. You have to be in a place where everyone is rowing the same direction. As a company, as an industry, as a planet and as a world, we have to be doing that.”

Tarkett will be doing its part. “We value our position as a global leader in sustainable flooring, and see these certifications as a way to guide our industry toward creating products that are better for people and better for the environment,” Martel added.

Among Tarkett’s achievements:

  • It is a partner of the World Economic Forum on circular economy, climate change and quality of life in the urban environment.
  • It was the first flooring producer to deploy phthalate-free vinyl flooring in North America.
  • Tarkett launched fully transparent Material Health Statements in 2016.
  • The company continually improves the chemistry within products to improve the built environment, including removing ortho-phthalates from products and developing Eco-Ensure, a fluorine-free soil protection technology for all Powerbond and modular products.

Sustainability’s evolution
When Martel took on her role as VP of sustainability a decade ago, she said sustainability was a lot about the planet (i.e., waste reduction, water reduction) but today it is a more balanced, holistic approach.

Rudi Daelmans, director of sustainability for Tarkett, said sustainability is evolving to what he termed “system thinking,” where everything is connected—the nutrients in the water, the safety materials, indoor air quality. “It is still evolving. It is a continuous drive toward sustainable business, which will drive innovation and new products. Staying on top of things and concentrating on sustainability makes you push your boundaries. If sustainability drives innovation you will have a company that is profitable and lasting.”

On the subject of innovation, Tarkett recently launched a backing material through its Tandus Centiva brand called ethos Modular with omnicoat technology. According to the company, ethos products are PVC-free and made from recycled PVB film commonly found in the abundantly available waste from automobile windshields and safety glass. In addition, ethos Modular is cradle-to-cradle certified Silver v3.1 and SCS Global Certified NSF 140 Platinum. Depending on the specified product, the total overall recycled content ranges from 26% to 51%. ethos is 100% recyclable through Tarkett’s ReStart program.

Paul Evans, vice president of R&D, Tarkett North America, said ethos addresses one of the most long-standing issues in new construction and renovation, namely moisture or other adverse flooring conditions that require costly delays in time as well as the potential for testing and remediation.

“Just as importantly, we make the backing using PVB derived from the recycling of film found in windshields and other safety glass, because a product that’s good for the health of those who use it and is made with respect to the environment begins with quality materials sourced properly.”

 

Posted on

Routman joins Metroflor as chief sustainability officer

Rochelle headshot verticalNorwalk, Conn.—Russ Rogg, president and CEO of Metroflor, along with Harlan Stone, Halstead and Group CEO, announced the appointment of Rochelle Routman, LEED AP, O+M, as the first chief sustainability officer for Metroflor and Halstead International. Chosen for her reputation as an alliance-building and forward-thinking professional, Routman will oversee product development, customer service and regulatory aspects in a collaborative fashion to define the greatest potential for environmental leadership. She will be based at the company’s Calhoun, Ga. campus.

Routman brings more than 30 years of experience as a sustainability and environmental professional. At Lockheed Martin Aeronautical Systems, where she served as pollution prevention and environmental safety coordinator in the 1990s, she established a “green team” to focus on addressing environmental issues through proactive program initiatives rather than mere regulatory compliance: the precursor of what we now call sustainability. A longtime employee of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, where she ultimately rose to program manager of its sustainability division, she then joined Georgia Power Company & Southern Company. As chair of the sustainability working group, she honed the company’s sustainability program and culture development, external communications and partnerships.

Prior to joining Metroflor/Halstead, Routman achieved groundbreaking advances at Mohawk Industries as director of sustainability, where she developed a market-disruptive strategy with a focus on product transparency. She directed all product certification efforts and led the employee and executive sustainability engagement council. Promoted to vice president of sustainability, Routman became Mohawk’s external spokesperson worldwide, establishing continuity in programs across the commercial, residential, international and hospitality business, including soft surface and resilient products.

A graduate of the University of Georgia with a bachelor’s degree in Geology and the Georgia Institute of Technology with a master’s degree in public policy, Routman was named one of the Top 10 Most Powerful Women Sustainability Leaders by Green Building & Design magazine in 2014 and is now the alumnae chair of the organization. She is a LEED AP, O+M (Operations & Maintenance), a Certified Hazardous Materials Manager, and a Registered Professional Geologist. As a Living Building Challenge Ambassador, she is part of a network committed to changing the way entire communities value sustainability, equity and prosperity by advocating for the most aspirational green building standard in the world.

“Over the years, Metroflor and Halstead have made great strides in our environmental and sustainability endeavors, and we have an unwavering commitment to continue pushing the envelope in this area of our business,” Rogg said. “Rochelle Routman joining our group allows us to build on what we’ve started while also pursuing new, innovative and creative ways to expand our sustainability platform. Rochelle brings tremendous knowledge, experience, credibility and passion to our organization, and we are grateful to have her lead our global efforts in the field of sustainability.”

Routman commented, “Halstead and Metroflor have longevity and a very strong focus on constant innovation, both in product and organizationally. The company officers were looking for someone with a very strong emotional connection and passion for sustainability. I’m very fortunate to assume a leadership position here to guide the ship towards more creative ways to support both the business and the planet.”

Posted on

DINP in vinyl flooring gets safe determination

RFCI LogoLaGrange, Ga.—The California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) has issued a Safe Use Determination (SUD) under Prop 65 for diisononyl phthalate (DINP) in vinyl flooring products. The finding is based on OEHHA’s determination that vinyl flooring products containing 18.9% or less of DINP by weight do not expose occupants of residences and commercial buildings to DINP exceeding “safe harbor levels.” Therefore, a Prop 65 consumer warning for qualifying products is not required. DINP has been used as a plasticizer in many products, including vinyl floors, to make them flexible.

The Resilient Floor Covering Institute (RFCI) asked OEHHA in November 2014 to evaluate exposure to DINP in vinyl flooring and issue an SUD after the chemical was added to the state’s Prop 65 list in December 2013. The request was the first SUD sought since late 2007. OEHHA issued the SUD on June 21, 2016.

“We are pleased that OEHHA has reviewed exposure levels of DINP in virgin and recycled vinyl flooring and found that qualifying products do not require a Prop 65 warning,” said Dean Thompson, RFCI president. “OEHHA’s decision confirms that DINP in vinyl flooring not exceeding the 18.9% threshold is safe and appropriate for homes and commercial buildings. DINP is a thoroughly studied compound that enhances the flexibility, resiliency, and long-lasting performance of many vinyl products.”

For more information about RFCI, visit rfci.com.

 

Posted on

Shaw releases 2015 sustainability report

Shaw CSR Cover-2015 Report med resDalton—Shaw Industries’ 2015 Sustainability Report released this week continues the company’s legacy of transparency through the disclosure of key metrics and progress against its goals.

The company’s 2030 sustainability goals include:

  • ŸReduce water intensity (per pound of finished product) by 50%
  • Decrease energy intensity by 40%
  • Reduce waste to landfills and hazardous waste by 100%
  • ŸDesign 100% of Shaw products to Cradle-to-Cradle protocols
  • Achieve an OSHA incident rate of zero
  • ŸReduce non-biogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions intensity by 40%

Shaw has reported its GHG performance since its inaugural annual sustainability report (covering calendar year 2008) and has formalized its commitment with a newly introduced 2030 target.

“Shaw is committed to continuous improvement and constantly driving innovation into our business based upon our perpetual quest for a deeper understanding of the needs of our customers, associates and communities,” said Vance Bell, Shaw chairman and CEO. “Our annual sustainability report reflects our progress and our continued investment in what our internal and external stakeholders deem most important.”

In addition to the new GHG goal, key items in the 2015 report include:

  • The company’s investment of nearly $300 million in capital expenditures, including strategic investments in multiple product categories and in automation, efficiency and technology advances in its operations
  • New calculation methods and baseline year for energy emissions and water intensity metrics that raise the bar for Shaw’s performance to align with industry standard reporting the company has been using as part of the Department of Energy’s Better Plants Program
  • Additional detail about Shaw’s investment in a new talent model as an innovation driver and key to long-term sustainability
  • Providing an average of almost 50 hours of training per associate for a total of more than one million training hours. These and other associate programs and benefits contributed to Shaw being recognized among Forbes’ America’s Best Employers 2015, Elearning magazine’s Learning100!, Training magazine’s Top 125 as well as being Great Places to Work certified.
  • Contributing more than 67,000 hours of volunteer time and more than $4.7 million to organizations that impact people’s lives in the communities where the company operates
  • The company’s ongoing commitment to a culture of inclusion, demonstrated through their investment in the Women’s Innovation Network (WiN), ShawVet, and unconscious bias education

“While we remain steadfastly focused on our 2030 goals, we are perpetually assessing whether they are reflective of our priorities and operations, that they are material for us and what matters most to our customers, associates and other stakeholders,” said Paul Murray, Shaw’s vice president of sustainability and environmental affairs. “We will continue to look for opportunities to listen and learn as we develop innovative products, processes and programs.”

Shaw’s sustainability report follows the Global Reporting Initiative framework and is third-party assured by Deloitte & Touche.

View Shaw’s 2015 Sustainability Report at https://shawinc.com/reports.

Posted on

Green Squared: Three years later, so far, so good

Volume 28/Number 6; September 1/8, 2014

By Louis Iannaco

Screen Shot 2014-09-11 at 9.54.26 AM
Almost three years after its inception, Green Squared, the initiative developed by the Tile Council of North America (TCNA) to recognize and certify sustainable products for the North American tile industry, is maintaining its importance, according to ceramic executives.

Flooring’s first sustainability standard for tile and tile installation materials, Green Squared was developed by TCNA under the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) process and recognizes manufacturers for environmental leadership and corporate social responsibility across a broad range of indicators, covering environmental product characteristics, product manufacturing and raw material extraction, end-of-product life management, progressive corporate governance and innovation.

According to Bill Griese, standards development/green initiative manager, TCNA, the standard has strengthened the tile industry’s presence in the green building community. “With continued influence and an emerging presence in today’s green building standards and rating systems, awareness of the standard and the demand for Green Squared-certified products are on the rise. This has resulted in increased A&D familiarity with Green Squared.”

Today, he noted, the use of Green Squared-certified products can directly contribute toward points or compliance in three major standards/rating systems: Green Globes for New Construction, NAHB National Green Building Standard and ASHRAE 189.1. The tile industry, in collaboration with several other flooring categories, is “working to establish similar references to Green Squared and other flooring industry programs in LEED and the International Green Construction Code.”

Green Squared certification was developed by TCNA to acknowledge products verified by an independent third party to be in conformance with ANSI A138.1. Products certified under Green Squared are allowed use of the Green Squared certified mark, an easily recognizable label that helps architects, designers and end users choose products that meet the industry’s range of sustainability criteria.

Scientific Certification Systems (SCS), which evaluated the first three certifications for products from Crossville, Interceramic and Metropolitan Ceramics by Ironrock, was among the first third-party certifiers accredited by TCNA to conduct evaluations under the standard.

Noah Chitty, technical services manager, Crossville, said Green Squared has allowed the tile industry to be part of the sustainability conversation in a way that was not possible before. “Since its inception, we’ve seen a major shift from single-attribute criteria to transparency and broader sustainability ideas.”

While discussions of potential revisions to LEED are ongoing, references to Green Squared in the International Green Construction Code were preliminarily approved in May, and the International Code Council’s final action on this decision will take place next month.

“Professionals are still waiting for the sustainability community to decide how multi-attribute systems will be recognized in LEED,” Chitty explained, “but they seem to appreciate that the standard has been developed.”

As Lori Kirk-Rolley, vice president, brand marketing, Dal-Tile, noted, since its introduction, Green Squared has made sustainable product selection easier than ever. “It’s more than just a labeling program; it represents North America’s consensus on what is required for a tile to be truly sustainable through measurable and verifiable criteria for products possessing a full range of social and ecological attributes. This means sustainable product specification is now easier, faster and more consistent across the industry.”

Daltile and American Olean were among the first brands to endorse the Green Squared program in 2012. All of the company’s U.S. facilities, as well as its Monterrey, Mexico, operations, were included in the third-party audit process, Kirk-Rolley noted, so architects and designers can be confident Dal-Tile products meet the standard’s requirements.

“This standard is helping us better assist our customers in the specification of tile products that meet both the sustainability and usability needs of the spaces they create,” she added. “The certification offers a clear definition of what the industry defines as a green product, thereby making it easier for our customers to identify environmentally friendly products for their flooring needs.

“It means when our customers choose a Dal-Tile product for their sustainable projects,” Kirk-Rolley added, “it isn’t just an easy decision; it’s one they can make with confidence.”

In 2013 Dal-Tile completed all the necessary process changes, and now 100% of its Daltile and American Olean branded products meet the Green Squared certification to the new ANSI Standard–A138.1 Sustainable Tile & Installation Materials.

Sean Cilona, marketing director, Florida Tile, said the domestic tile industry needed Green Squared in order to create an independent body that can substantiate environmental claims made by manufacturers. “It has been a great way for us to differentiate ourselves and our products from foreign competitors and give each of us another solid selling point when promoting ourselves to an increasingly environmentally conscious market.”

Regarding its progress, he noted, Green Squared is something that is still making its way through the marketplace and into the hands of the end user. “It has been a great step toward some of the third-party certifications that are part of the LEED v4 program.”

For Crossville, Green Squared means the company can focus more on an overall sustainability message instead of having to chase individual criteria. “It allows us to focus on a broader set of goals, which is good for us and our customers,” Chitty said.

Crossville adopted process-based standards in sustainability years before Green Squared, he explained, “and through third-party evaluations we certified our processes instead of products. Green Squared provided validation of this approach and broadened the concept to involve all aspects of the company, not just the production process.”

Screen Shot 2014-08-28 at 12.40.18 PM

 

What the future holds

As Griese noted, the tile industry is historically rooted in stringent consensus standards and, therefore, is continuously pushing for improvement in the field of sustainability. “This means Green Squared will evolve over time to raise the bar for product sustainability—from manufacturing requirements, to materials and resources, to product use phase and end of life—all with a focus on the environment and society.”

With today’s focus on product transparency and a growing demand for facts to back up sustainability claims, it is possible that Green Squared will become even more prevalent. “It’s likely that industry-wide life cycle reporting initiatives and environmental product declarations (EPD) will be tied into the overall Green Squared message,” Griese concluded.

Posted on

Dal-Tile gets first EPD for ceramic tile category

daltile-industry-first-epd-north-america-fullDallas—Dal-Tile said it recently completed the Environmental Product Declaration (EPD) development process for all products manufactured in the company’s North American production facilities.

With third-party validation from PE International and certification by UL Environment, Dal-Tile is the first manufacturer in the ceramic tile category to voluntarily disclose cradle-to-grave impacts from its products—from Daltile, American Olean, Marazzi USA and Ragno brands—with UL Environment certified EPDs. Continue reading Dal-Tile gets first EPD for ceramic tile category

Posted on

Interface releases Evolving Eco and Social Metrics updates

Atlanta – Interface, the global modular carpet company that has pioneered sustainable business practices since 1994, has recently released annual data updating its metrics portfolio to include information on progress towards environmental and social goals.

Highlights include updated EcoMetrics data as well as an expanded portfolio of SocioMetrics, including highlights from a project to document sustainability engagement at Interface facilities around the world, “I Am Mission Zero.” Continue reading Interface releases Evolving Eco and Social Metrics updates

Posted on

Updated National Green Building Standard debuts at International Builders' Show

Builders, remodelers, product manufacturers and other industry professionals got their first deep dive into a brand-new edition of the ICC 700 National Green Building Standard (NGBS) during “Green Day” at the International Builders’ Show in Las Vegas last month.

First published in 2009, NGBS forms the basis of many local and national programs and allows builders to certify new homes and remodeling projects that meet established criteria in energy efficiency, water and resource conservation, indoor air quality, lot and site development and home owner education. The updated edition–the only green building rating system for residential construction approved by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI)–raises the bar for energy-efficiency requirements and revolutionizes the treatment of renovations and remodeling projects. Continue reading Updated National Green Building Standard debuts at International Builders' Show

Posted on

Turner Construction Company releases Market Barometer survey results

New York — Turner Construction Company, recognized as the leading general builder and the largest green builder in the United States, announced today the results of a new Market Barometer survey that focused on environmentally sustainable, or “green” building, and on sustainable practices in general. Key findings revealed that companies remain committed to constructing green buildings. While executives remained committed to incorporating sustainable building practices into their building programs, fewer said their companies were likely to seek LEED certification from the US Green Building Council when constructing a green building.  Continue reading Turner Construction Company releases Market Barometer survey results