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Installation: Today’s adhesives in lockstep with ‘green’ flooring trends

November 6/13, 2017: Volume 32, Issue 11

By Lindsay Baillie

 

As more floor covering manufacturers embrace environmentally friendly practices in the development of their products, producers of adhesives and installation materials are following suit. Many of today’s green glues tout key attributes such as low-to-zero VOCs, are solvent free and are indoor air quality certified to high standards, thereby contributing to LEED. These qualities are beneficial to not only the end user and the environment but also the installers who handle the products on a daily basis.

Following is a sampling of some of the latest green adhesives.

Bonstone
Screen Shot 2017-11-13 at 10.36.35 AM
Touchstone T-2000 is one of Bonstone’s top adhesives for floor and wall tile installations. In addition to exceeding ANSI-A-118.3 requirement, Touchstone T-2000 is chemical resistant, has low VOCs and offers a long open time.

“Our products are designed for permanent installations,” said Mike Beckmann, president. “They are structural products designed to last as long as the lifetime of the substrate. So, if you are installing a countertop, a floor or wall tile, or restoring a building or monument, the adhesive will last as long as the lifetime of the structure.”

Touchstone T-2000, a 100% epoxy, has exceptional strength, durability, adhesion, temperature resistance and chemical resistance. These properties make them suitable for aggressive installations, such as breweries, dairies, wineries, etc., where frequent steam-cleaning is necessary to maintain hygienic conditions.

Screen Shot 2017-11-13 at 10.36.42 AMDriTac
DriTac 7800 Supreme Green is DriTac’s latest multi-functional adhesive solution for the wood flooring industry. It is a single-component, premium green sound and moisture control hybrid polymer wood flooring adhesive that can serve to isolate old cutback adhesive residue and suppress concrete subfloor cracks. Supreme Green provides unlimited subfloor moisture control with no testing required and a lifetime warranty.

DriTac 7800 contains zero isocyanates, zero VOCs, zero solvents and has been independently tested and certified by CRI for indoor air quality. Supreme Green is manufactured in the USA and can be used to install multi-ply engineered plank, solid wood plank, bamboo flooring and more.

“This is the very first wood flooring adhesive that boasts five installation solutions in one pail, allowing retailers to now stock one SKU in place of the several required in the past,” said John Lio, vice president of marketing. “Requiring effortless cleaning—wet or dry—off the surface of hardwood flooring, this flooring installation solution provides value for installers, retailers and their customers.”

DriTac offers a full-line of wood and resilient flooring adhesives certified by CRI’s Green Label Plus program. The company manufactures all of its adhesives in compliance with all mandated regulations and requirements at the federal, state and local levels.

Screen Shot 2017-11-13 at 10.36.48 AMSchönox
Schönox Emiclassic can be used with interior floor and wall products including vinyl, linoleum, rubber, impact sound insulation underlayment, carpet, needle felt and PVC. It is resistant to moisture as high as 90% RH or 9 lbs., covers up to 850 square feet with one 4-gallon pail and is easily applied with a notch trowel or roller.

Emiclassic can be installed over absorbent and non-absorbent substrates. What’s more, it allows the installer to control the tack of the glue changing from wet, tacky and pressure-sensitive installation with short waiting times between 10-60 minutes. Its alkaline-resistant technology also makes the adhesive “Ph irrelevant,” the company stated.

Due to its very low emissions (EC 1PLUS, EPD and FloorScore certified), low odor and solvent free characteristics, Schönox Emiclassic is safer for the health of the labor force, the end user and the environment.

Screen Shot 2017-11-13 at 10.36.55 AMHenry
New to Henry, an Ardex Americas brand, is Henry 622 vinyl bond premium high strength vinyl flooring adhesive is a certified bio-based product. It’s an ideal adhesive for environmentally conscious installers who are working with LVT-type products. Henry 622, which features the company’s GreenLine logo, boasts environmentally friendly technology designed to meet or exceed industry and governmental regulations. All Henry adhesives with the GreenLine logo have ultra-low VOC emissions, low or no odor and contributions to LEED.

“At Henry being green isn’t just a slogan, it’s part of our culture,” said Ed Masilunas, Henry business manager. “We’re committed to minimalizing our environmental footprint throughout the manufacturing process, including the use of sustainable materials, recyclable packaging and less residual waste.”

Screen Shot 2017-11-13 at 10.37.07 AMUzin
Uzin, a UFloor brand, now offers KE 66, a premium, fiber-reinforced, wet set adhesive, designed for the installation of vinyl and rubber flooring on porous substrates. This hard-setting, high shear strength adhesive has excellent resistance to indentations and shrinkage and is effective in areas where rolling loads and furniture are in use.

Uzin KE 66 meets the strict GEV-Emicode EC 1 Plus criteria for indoor emissions testing. GEV is the European testing agency Association for the Control of Emissions in Products for Flooring Installation, Adhesives and Building Materials. GEV’s stringent standards are recognized internationally as the highest level of indoor air quality protection. KE 66, a LEED v4 contributing product, meets the rigorous California Sect. 01350 standard as well as meets the SCAQMD rule 1168 with less than 30g/l VOC.

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Living Product Expo: Tarkett pushes boundaries of sustainable building

October 9/16, 2017: Volume 32, Issue 9

By Ken Ryan

 

Screen Shot 2017-10-17 at 9.43.16 AMPittsburgh—There are flooring companies that like to stake their claim to the “green” label when, in reality, their products mostly meet baseline certification for sustainability. And then there are those few companies that take responsible manufacturing to an entirely different plane.

That short list includes Tarkett.

From eco-design and installation to recycling and reuse, Tarkett has demonstrated over decades a commitment to continuously developing products with the planet and people in mind.

Tarkett North America has applied cradle-to-cradle principles to product development since 2011 and today holds more product and material certifications (175) than all other flooring manufacturers. “Having so many products and materials cradle-to-cradle certified demonstrates our commitment to both the built environment and the planet as a whole,” said Diane Martel, vice president of environmental planning and strategy for Tarkett North America.

Martel was a presenter at the Living Product Expo in Pittsburgh in September. She took part in a seminar titled: “Can PVC be made into a Living Product?” PVC, which is used in most manufacturing of vinyl flooring, has several advantages, including low cost and ease of replacing individual tiles. However, PVC is not inherently green, experts say. In fact, it has been called “the poison plastic” because the emissions from PVC—at certain levels—can create health hazards such as dioxins and furans, two of the most toxic chemicals on the planet.

During the discussion, Martel argued that PVC could be a sustainable product if done responsibly. “It’s about cleaning up the chemistry of PVC. We’re taking other people’s wastage streams and finding potential use for it. PVC is extremely easy to recycle. We should be closing the loop on PVC.”

By “we” she means the flooring industry at large. Tarkett wants to work with other companies to find solutions that will benefit the planet. “We can only solve this if we collaborate and people adhere to something that is actionable and reasonable,” Martel explained. “We find that opening the door to collaboration and cooperation is really the path to take. You have to be in a place where everyone is rowing the same direction. As a company, as an industry, as a planet and as a world, we have to be doing that.”

Tarkett will be doing its part. “We value our position as a global leader in sustainable flooring, and see these certifications as a way to guide our industry toward creating products that are better for people and better for the environment,” Martel added.

Among Tarkett’s achievements:

  • It is a partner of the World Economic Forum on circular economy, climate change and quality of life in the urban environment.
  • It was the first flooring producer to deploy phthalate-free vinyl flooring in North America.
  • Tarkett launched fully transparent Material Health Statements in 2016.
  • The company continually improves the chemistry within products to improve the built environment, including removing ortho-phthalates from products and developing Eco-Ensure, a fluorine-free soil protection technology for all Powerbond and modular products.

Sustainability’s evolution
When Martel took on her role as VP of sustainability a decade ago, she said sustainability was a lot about the planet (i.e., waste reduction, water reduction) but today it is a more balanced, holistic approach.

Rudi Daelmans, director of sustainability for Tarkett, said sustainability is evolving to what he termed “system thinking,” where everything is connected—the nutrients in the water, the safety materials, indoor air quality. “It is still evolving. It is a continuous drive toward sustainable business, which will drive innovation and new products. Staying on top of things and concentrating on sustainability makes you push your boundaries. If sustainability drives innovation you will have a company that is profitable and lasting.”

On the subject of innovation, Tarkett recently launched a backing material through its Tandus Centiva brand called ethos Modular with omnicoat technology. According to the company, ethos products are PVC-free and made from recycled PVB film commonly found in the abundantly available waste from automobile windshields and safety glass. In addition, ethos Modular is cradle-to-cradle certified Silver v3.1 and SCS Global Certified NSF 140 Platinum. Depending on the specified product, the total overall recycled content ranges from 26% to 51%. ethos is 100% recyclable through Tarkett’s ReStart program.

Paul Evans, vice president of R&D, Tarkett North America, said ethos addresses one of the most long-standing issues in new construction and renovation, namely moisture or other adverse flooring conditions that require costly delays in time as well as the potential for testing and remediation.

“Just as importantly, we make the backing using PVB derived from the recycling of film found in windshields and other safety glass, because a product that’s good for the health of those who use it and is made with respect to the environment begins with quality materials sourced properly.”

 

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CARE releases annual recycling report

May 8/15, 2017: Volume 31, Issue 24

Screen Shot 2017-05-15 at 2.11.10 PMIndianapolis—Members participating in the Carpet America Recovery Effort (CARE) program diverted more than 488 million pounds of carpet from U.S. landfills in 2016—down nearly 6% from 2015. That’s according to the group’s annual report, released at CARE’s 15th annual conference held here earlier this month.

Of the carpet diverted to recycling, 167 million pounds were recycled into carpet and other consumer products, 174 million pounds were sent back to the landfill, and 144 million pounds were sent to waste-to-energy and cement kilns.

Despite the impressive numbers, 2016 was a challenging year for CARE in terms of marketplace activity and demand for various fiber types. “Data shows the carpet recycling industry is under mounting stress,” said Dr. Robert Peoples, executive director. “Until oil returns to greater than $70 per barrel, we see continuing turbulent times ahead.”

Other highlights of the report: 72% of recycled post-consumer carpet is manufactured into plastics. This category has grown over the past few years. The amount of material recycled in carpet fiber dropped from 13% to 3%. Carpet backing remained constant at 8% of end products manufactured. Meanwhile, 11% of recycled post-consumer carpet pounds that were recycled went into new carpet. This is considered a true cradle-to-cradle process.

Screen Shot 2017-05-15 at 2.11.14 PMCarpet recycling employed 1,215 people in 2016. This is a decrease of 80 people or 6% vs. the jobs reported in 2015. To date, CARE members have kept over 4.6 billion pounds of waste carpet out of landfills since CARE was founded in 2002.

CARE continues to refine its survey methodology. It began using a mass balance approach in 2013. This methodology focuses material flows by examining inputs and outputs in each step of the recycling process.

CARE is a voluntary, non-profit organization dedicated to increasing the landfill diversion, reuse and recycling of waste carpet, through market-based solutions that benefit the economy as well as the environment at large.

For more information about CARE, visit carpetrecovery.org.