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Tarkett provide environmental, material disclosures to A&D community

tarkett-logoSolon, Ohio—Tarkett has partnered with Sustainable Minds (SM) to provide a simple and easy way for architects and designers to find material and environmental product transparency information on more than 850 Tarkett products across all its North American brands—Tandus Centiva, Johnsonite and Desso—and all in one place: the SM Transparency Catalog.

“Product transparency is increasingly important to our customers who want to understand the environmental and material health impacts of our products, and they need to be able to access that information quickly and easily to make informed decisions,” said Diane Martel, vice president of sustainability, Tarkett. “Transparency, along with the data to support it, is particularly important to project owners who are working to meet rating systems requirements. Our efforts are helping these owners choose healthy products for healthy spaces.”

The SM Transparency Catalog is designed to help architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) professionals easily find products with transparency information that qualify for green building rating systems including: The Collaborative for High Performance Schools (CHPS), LEED v4, Green Globes, the Well Building Standard and the Living Building Challenge.

“People aren’t looking for disclosures—they want high performing products with disclosures,” said Terry Swack, chief executive officer, Sustainable Minds. “Working with Tarkett to organize all of its brands and products into one integrated listing informed the development of new options for manufacturers to reinforce or build greener brand recognition within our catalog.”

 

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Routman joins Metroflor as chief sustainability officer

Rochelle headshot verticalNorwalk, Conn.—Russ Rogg, president and CEO of Metroflor, along with Harlan Stone, Halstead and Group CEO, announced the appointment of Rochelle Routman, LEED AP, O+M, as the first chief sustainability officer for Metroflor and Halstead International. Chosen for her reputation as an alliance-building and forward-thinking professional, Routman will oversee product development, customer service and regulatory aspects in a collaborative fashion to define the greatest potential for environmental leadership. She will be based at the company’s Calhoun, Ga. campus.

Routman brings more than 30 years of experience as a sustainability and environmental professional. At Lockheed Martin Aeronautical Systems, where she served as pollution prevention and environmental safety coordinator in the 1990s, she established a “green team” to focus on addressing environmental issues through proactive program initiatives rather than mere regulatory compliance: the precursor of what we now call sustainability. A longtime employee of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, where she ultimately rose to program manager of its sustainability division, she then joined Georgia Power Company & Southern Company. As chair of the sustainability working group, she honed the company’s sustainability program and culture development, external communications and partnerships.

Prior to joining Metroflor/Halstead, Routman achieved groundbreaking advances at Mohawk Industries as director of sustainability, where she developed a market-disruptive strategy with a focus on product transparency. She directed all product certification efforts and led the employee and executive sustainability engagement council. Promoted to vice president of sustainability, Routman became Mohawk’s external spokesperson worldwide, establishing continuity in programs across the commercial, residential, international and hospitality business, including soft surface and resilient products.

A graduate of the University of Georgia with a bachelor’s degree in Geology and the Georgia Institute of Technology with a master’s degree in public policy, Routman was named one of the Top 10 Most Powerful Women Sustainability Leaders by Green Building & Design magazine in 2014 and is now the alumnae chair of the organization. She is a LEED AP, O+M (Operations & Maintenance), a Certified Hazardous Materials Manager, and a Registered Professional Geologist. As a Living Building Challenge Ambassador, she is part of a network committed to changing the way entire communities value sustainability, equity and prosperity by advocating for the most aspirational green building standard in the world.

“Over the years, Metroflor and Halstead have made great strides in our environmental and sustainability endeavors, and we have an unwavering commitment to continue pushing the envelope in this area of our business,” Rogg said. “Rochelle Routman joining our group allows us to build on what we’ve started while also pursuing new, innovative and creative ways to expand our sustainability platform. Rochelle brings tremendous knowledge, experience, credibility and passion to our organization, and we are grateful to have her lead our global efforts in the field of sustainability.”

Routman commented, “Halstead and Metroflor have longevity and a very strong focus on constant innovation, both in product and organizationally. The company officers were looking for someone with a very strong emotional connection and passion for sustainability. I’m very fortunate to assume a leadership position here to guide the ship towards more creative ways to support both the business and the planet.”

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DINP in vinyl flooring gets safe determination

RFCI LogoLaGrange, Ga.—The California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) has issued a Safe Use Determination (SUD) under Prop 65 for diisononyl phthalate (DINP) in vinyl flooring products. The finding is based on OEHHA’s determination that vinyl flooring products containing 18.9% or less of DINP by weight do not expose occupants of residences and commercial buildings to DINP exceeding “safe harbor levels.” Therefore, a Prop 65 consumer warning for qualifying products is not required. DINP has been used as a plasticizer in many products, including vinyl floors, to make them flexible.

The Resilient Floor Covering Institute (RFCI) asked OEHHA in November 2014 to evaluate exposure to DINP in vinyl flooring and issue an SUD after the chemical was added to the state’s Prop 65 list in December 2013. The request was the first SUD sought since late 2007. OEHHA issued the SUD on June 21, 2016.

“We are pleased that OEHHA has reviewed exposure levels of DINP in virgin and recycled vinyl flooring and found that qualifying products do not require a Prop 65 warning,” said Dean Thompson, RFCI president. “OEHHA’s decision confirms that DINP in vinyl flooring not exceeding the 18.9% threshold is safe and appropriate for homes and commercial buildings. DINP is a thoroughly studied compound that enhances the flexibility, resiliency, and long-lasting performance of many vinyl products.”

For more information about RFCI, visit rfci.com.

 

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Tile: Ceramic companies leaving big impression with small carbon footprint

Ceramic tile has long been known as one of the most hygienically clean and environmentally friendly products the flooring industry has to offer. The segment is full of companies that take the matter of making a small carbon footprint to heart, and in practice, in a very big way. The following is an environmental update of what some companies are currently doing in the way of environmental friendliness. Continue reading Tile: Ceramic companies leaving big impression with small carbon footprint