Posted on

Daltile awards winners of sixth annual Interior Design scholarship competition

Daltile Interior Design ScholarshipPhiladelphia—Daltile, in partnership with the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) Foundation and the Booz Allen Hamilton Innovation Center, has awarded Baileigh Petty the grand prize of the sixth annual Daltile Interior Design Scholarship, presented by the ASID Foundation. A panel of experts from the design industry and beyond used their experience to judge and award scholarships to Petty and three finalists.

This year’s challenge was to reimagine the Booz Allen Hamilton Innovation Center using Daltile products and incorporating Fitwel components to create a stimulating, comfortable and futuristic space for employees. Students were asked to look at the entire Innovation Center space and identify areas of opportunity throughout the floor plan that could be redesigned to increase occupant health and comfort, while adhering to a $25,000 to $50,000 budget limitation.

Petty, a senior at Utah State University majoring in Interior Design, was named this year’s grand prize winner during a special event at the Daltile Philadelphia Design Studio on Nov. 15. In her winning project, Petty transformed the Center’s recharge room, a space for employees to take a break from their work, enjoy healthy snacks and coffee, and network with their colleagues in a relaxed environment. Her winning design showcased a variety of products from Daltile, including Fabric Art, Amity, Panoramic Porcelain Surfaces and Volume 1.0.

In addition to Petty, three runners-up were each awarded $2,500 scholarships. This year’s scholarship recipients are:

  • Grand-prize, $10,000 scholarship winner: Baileigh Petty, Utah State University
  • First runner-up, $2,500 scholarship winner: Brianne Brooks, Utah State University
  • Second runner-up, $2,500 scholarship winner: Amanda McRae, Utah State University
  • Third runner-up, $2,500 scholarship winner: Sasitorn Wangspa, Utah State University

Similar to last year’s competition, the school or university with the highest number of completed entries was awarded a $10,000 grant for their interior design program. For the second year in a row, Utah State University won the grant, with 70 students entering the competition.

For more information, visit daltiledesign.com.

Posted on

Daltile Interior Design Scholarship entries showcase tile

Screen Shot 2017-10-30 at 9.36.12 AMDallas—Judging is currently underway for the sixth annual Daltile Interior Design Scholarship Competition, presented by the ASID Foundation. The designs entered by college students nationwide exemplify that tile is now widely used as a design element in today’s interior design world.

“Over the last five years, tile has emerged as a design element, whereas in the past, it was a utilitarian product,” said Shelly Halbert, director of product design for Dal-Tile and one of the judges for this year’s competition. “Five years ago we considered our Daltile products part of the tile industry. Today, they are part of the larger interior design industry.”

The 2017 competition challenged college students to reimagine the Booz Allen Hamilton Innovation Center in Washington, D.C., and to incorporate at least two Daltile products in their design vision. Daltile will award $27,500 in scholarships to aspiring interior design students who entered the competition from across the country. The panel of four judges is comprised of professionals from Daltile, OTJ Architects, Booz Allen Hamilton, and last year’s winner, Kristina Tribell of Abel Design Group. Winners will be announced on Nov. 15 at the Daltile Philadelphia Design Studio during NeoCon East 2017 in Philadelphia.

“While reviewing this year’s contest entries, I’ve noticed several consistencies among these young designers,” Halbert said. “As far as their overall style, student designs are generally falling into either modern or organic. Given free rein to use any two Daltile products in their concepts, the contestants overwhelmingly selected products that reflect many of today’s hottest trends in their tile choices—neutral colors and marble-looks, including white, gray and black, as well as traditional marbles in beige and brown. Lots of wood-look tiles, large format tiles and slabs, concrete looks and fabric-inspired tile products were also used. A few submissions showcase a blending of materials, such as wood-look and concrete-look tiles, creating eye-catching designs.”

For more information, visit daltiledesign.com.

Posted on

Beyond flooring: Daltile countertop program—A new revenue stream for retailers

October 9/16, 2017: Volume 32, Issue 9

 

Floor covering retailers are constantly seeking fresh ways to boost their bottom line, whether it’s expanding product offerings or entering new businesses altogether. To that end, with this issue FCNews launches its exclusive partnership with Dal-Tile, a major player in the countertop segment, in producing an ongoing editorial series that demonstrates how retailers can make money via this lucrative category.

Screen Shot 2017-10-17 at 9.47.13 AMA profitable market opportunity. The U.S. countertop industry—which includes anything in traditional countertop or the new, large-slab format—is estimated to be about $5 billion in sales annually, with roughly half of this coming from stone, quartz and the brand new category of porcelain slab. Quartz continues to grow at double-digit rates, and the new kid on the block, porcelain, is quickly becoming a significant part of the slab market and is expected to grow exponentially over the next few years. So, there is obviously money to be made by providing countertop products to retail customers. Also, consumers are already coming into flooring retailers’ showrooms to buy floor and wall tile for renovations, so why send them elsewhere to purchase their countertops? By adding countertops to the total sale, retailers can easily increase their profits.

Daltile: Your trusted partner. The fastest-growing countertop categories (stone, quartz and porcelain) are the product lines that Daltile is already an expert at producing. Daltile, a player in the stone and slab space since opening its first slab yard in 1999, has grown into a leading supplier of countertops over the years, spearheading innovation and evolution in the industry. The brand’s nationwide network includes high-end showroom/warehouse locations that stock and display an incredibly broad range of natural granite, marble and quartzite slabs as well as Dal-Tile’s One Quartz offering. By recently supercharging its existing business in countertops with renewed focus, new investments and innovations, Daltile is giving retailers the opportunity to win an even larger portion of the lucrative countertop market.

Screen Shot 2017-10-17 at 9.47.24 AMBy providing superior countertop solutions under the trusted Daltile brand name, the company is making it easier for retailers to execute a “complete sale,” comprising both tile flooring and countertop products.

Sales support, training. Success entails more than providing retailers with trendy products. Daltile’s newly enhanced countertop offering also comes with a comprehensive support package. “This includes training and certification programs for fabricators as well as effective merchandising vehicles for all customer segments,” said Paij Thorn-Brooks, vice president of marketing. “Extensive literature has also been created to effectively educate the retail sales associate, guide the consumer through the selection process, accurately convey the levels of style and design inherent in all of our large-format slabs and train the installer. We have put everything in place to help our retailers successfully add countertops to their existing businesses, and we also have the infrastructure to support them for continued success in this lucrative and fast-growing arena.”

Screen Shot 2017-10-17 at 9.47.32 AMAs Daltile further invests in the countertop industry, the brand will continue to be the customer’s leading resource for her product needs. Regardless of the vision or application, Daltile offers customers across the nation the products and resources they need to bring their designs to life.

Leadership in innovation. “Daltile’s new countertop focus is being driven by product and technical innovations,” said Matt Kahny, executive vice president. “We have launched porcelain slabs that deliver the incredible beauty of natural stone along with the durability and performance of porcelain. We have introduced proprietary, high-style granites and quartzites as well as new One Quartz products that cover a diverse array of designs. Innovation in style, design, technology and performance in everything we do.”

Thorn-Brooks credits Daltile with revolutionizing porcelain slabs. “We took countertops to the next level through investment and innovation, and style and design leadership in the porcelain slab arena. Daltile’s new Panoramic Porcelain Surfaces offer the ultimate in design and style flexibility.”

Screen Shot 2017-10-17 at 9.47.42 AMInvestments pay dividends. Daltile is investing significantly to develop and implement the tools and technologies needed to offer the products with which retailers can make more money in the countertop segment. “Our greatest investment is the new plant we are building in Tennessee to increase participation in quartz countertops,” Kahny explained. “This facility will be operational in 2018. Our investments also span several additional areas of our business, including establishing new Daltile Stone Centers to expand our network and get closer to our customers. We currently have centers across the country and will continue expanding in 2018.”

Posted on

Dal-Tile renews agreement with D.R. Horton

Daltile River Marble 1Dallas—Dal-Tile Corp. was recently renewed as the “exclusive tile provider” for America’s largest home builder by volume, D.R. Horton. In addition, Dal-Tile was also selected as the home builder’s “preferred countertop provider.” Dal-Tile manufactures and owns top tile brands, including Daltile, American Olean and Marazzi.

“In this relationship, America’s largest home builder and America’s largest tile manufacturer become a formidable force to bring the highest levels of design, quality and value to homes across the nation,” said Dan Butterfield, general manager of the builder channel, Dal-Tile. “D.R. Horton is committed to excellence in construction, consistently delivering top-quality new homes to homebuyers. Dal-Tile is the ideal partner for such a builder.”

Butterfield continued, “When builders partner with Dal-Tile, our specialized builder team becomes an exceptional resource for each builder’s corporate, regional and local needs, including customized program development. Dal-Tile puts three of the world’s top tile brands (Daltile, American Olean and Marazzi) at a builder’s disposal to create programs that easily meet all product and style needs.”

For more information, visit daltile.com, americanolean.com and marazziusa.com.

 

Posted on

Ceramic: Next-gen digital printing technologies unlock tile’s potential

July 3/10: Volume 32, Issue 2

By Lindsay Baillie

 

Screen Shot 2017-07-10 at 3.26.15 PMDigital printing has helped to change the tile industry by providing manufacturers with limitless designs that mimic what is trending amongst consumers. Whether it’s natural stone, cement, marble, slate or wood looks, digital printing offers consumers the looks they want, the ability to put it where they want and at a desirable price range—all of which ultimately benefits the specialty retailer.

Case in point is Confindustria Ceramica, which finds digital printing to be one of the key technologies used in Italian ceramic tile production. “When it was first introduced, it could only guarantee satisfactory results for certain materials, but it can now be used successfully for any kind of product,” said Vittorio Borelli, chairman. “Its role has been further strengthened by the emergence of the second major innovation in ceramics, that of large-format panels and slabs, given that digital technology is essential for decorating these products.”

As technologies continue to advance, manufacturers from all over the globe are developing newer visuals and textures. Some of the newer design trends Barbara Haaksma, vice president of marketing Emser Tile, has noticed include Moroccan and Spanish looks, as well as antique visuals that mimic handmade tile. The main development she sees focuses on the manufacturer’s ability to customize products. “Another trend we’re seeing is the ability to create art on tile. Artists are now doing renderings and it’s being reproduced on tile. All of that is great to do now that the technology allows for it. I think in general we’re seeing a lot of customization.”

Haaksma explained that the new customizable features of tile are a bonus for specialty retailers, especially those who have designers or customers who want to create their own images. This trend lets tile take on higher-end looks with greater nuances, not only among tiles but customers as well.

Other tile manufacturers, such as Dal-Tile—the parent company of Marazzi, Daltile, American Olean and Ragno—are also creating more sophisticated products with the help of next-generation digital printing. “The evolution of printing technology has led to manufacturers being able to create unique patterns and designs on individual tiles, similar to the natural materials, like wood or stone, which we are replicating with high degrees of authenticity,” said Gianni Mattioli, executive vice president, product and marketing.

Part of Dal-Tile’s digital printing technology includes what the company calls “Reveal Imaging.” As Mattioli explained: “[It] is our state-of-the-art digital printing process that produces realistic color, detail and veining that is unique on every single tile for a look that’s virtually indistinguishable from natural stone. Digital printing technology is giving us—as well as other tile manufacturers—a competitive advantage over other flooring categories.”

Beyond the ability to recreate various designs and patterns is the ability of the new technologies to apply different materials to the tile. For example, the innovations at Crossville allow its digital printer to manufacture gloss, matte and luster glaze effects on its tiles, according to Craig Miller, R&D director.

Screen Shot 2017-07-10 at 3.26.40 PMMS International (MSI) is also incorporating newer printing technology that enables a quicker production process. “Digital printer manufacturing companies, such as Kerajet from Spain, recently developed an inkjet printer that will be able to apply both glaze and ink in one step,” said Paulo Pereira Jr., senior merchant porcelain. “Since these cutting-edge digital printers can apply both enamels and solids simultaneously—besides the basic graphic effect—products can also incorporate other effects such as metallic, shiny or anti-slip effects in the same, one-step application.”

In that same vein, advanced technologies employed at Emser Tile are allowing the manufacturer to incorporate ink-jet printing deeper into the surface. “It’s not just a print sitting on top of the surface, but it actually becomes ingrained into the bisque,” Haaksma said. “So then the patterns and the colors are now infused into the tile itself.”

Overall, newer printing technologies are allowing manufacturers to innovate throughout the entire production process. For Borelli, this includes “image acquisition techniques that allow for ever higher levels of definition; increasingly powerful graphic design software capable of processing the images; more precise and high-performance print heads; and the development of suitable ceramic glazes.”

Retailer benefits
While next-generation digital printing provides manufacturers with benefits, it ultimately helps specialty retailers sell tile product at higher margins, according to tile executives.

These new technologies are enabling the consolidation of flooring products including wood, laminates, natural stones, etc. “For specialty retailers the requirement for training their sales team goes down as product lines are consolidated,” MSI’s Pereira said. “In addition, it enables more individualism for customers in the design process as the amount of choice significantly increases.”

Screen Shot 2017-07-10 at 3.26.09 PMWith the help of digital printing, consumers can also get high-end looks and high-performance flooring—both of which are available through porcelain tile at a much more affordable price. One example of this is found in tile that resembles natural stone. “[Natural stone] continues to gain strength in the market, but it is not suitable for all applications,” Emser Tile’s Haaksma said. “So you can get the realistic stone look with the performance, durability and affordability of porcelain. This way you can put it in a kitchen countertop, or wet space where you wouldn’t usually want to put a stone.”

Higher margins are available to retailers courtesy of the attractive characteristics made possible through digitally printed tile. “These types of products are letting retailers expand their margin dollars by drawing more consumers to their showrooms to buy products that were once unimaginable for a typical homeowner,” Mattioli explained.

Homeowners, industry expert say, are often inspired by botique hotels, spas and hospitality spaces they encounter through traveling. “In the past, the durability concerns and price points of rare stones and marbles prevented many consumers from bringing these gorgeous high-end looks in their own homes,” Mattioli explained. “However, through Dal-Tile’s Reveal Imaging technology, our brands are able to offer the visuals of rare stones and marbles in a tile product. This lets consumers have the look they love with the performance that real-life activity and real life budgets demand.”

For Confindustria Ceramica’s Borelli, higher margins are attainable by comparing past and present products. “All you have to do is compare these products with those that were available just five years ago to appreciate the progress that has been made. But it is crucial for retailers to communicate this value to their customers so that they are prepared to pay a premium for ceramic products that stand out in terms of innovation, technology and technical characteristics.”

Digitally differentiating
Most digital printing technologies are not proprietary—meaning manufacturers are often using similar machinery to produce hundreds of different products. When it comes to differentiating digitally printed tile, most manufacturers keep a close eye on developing trends to extract key details that will be unique to their product lines.

Screen Shot 2017-07-10 at 3.26.04 PM“While digital decoration technology is capable of creating products with superior technical characteristics, it does mean the same plant solutions are being adopted across the entire Italian ceramic industry,” Borelli said. “What really sets companies apart is their stylistic choices, their use of graphic designs, colors and surface textures.”

Crossville aims to differentiate itself from other tile manufacturers by blending traditional printing technology and ceramic material effects with digitally printed images. “We call it a ‘digital-plus’ approach that allows us to create looks that are unique to Crossville products and are not replicable,” Miller explained.

For manufacturers such as Dal-Tile and its associate brands, differentiation comes from not only creating differing designs, but also from developing multiple products. “The vast array of tile offered by our brands provides every customer with a solution for every challenge they may face,” Mattioli explained.

 

Posted on

Daltile Gallery hosts hundreds at annual NeoCon luncheon

Screen Shot 2017-06-23 at 10.50.43 AMChicago—Daltile’s Chicago Design Gallery recently welcomed over 500 architects, designers and other customers to its annual “Parked At NeoCon” lunch event. Held every year during the international NeoCon commercial design tradeshow, Daltile’s luncheon showcased the brand’s exciting new products and gave NeoCon attendees a nice, relaxing oasis from the miles-long tradeshow held just across the street in Chicago’s Merchandise Mart. Daltile’s Chicago Design Gallery is part of the brand’s vast network of design galleries, design studios and design service centers catering to customers nationwide.

“Like all of the showrooms in our nationwide network, Daltile’s Chicago Design Gallery showcases samples of our entire line, including our newly-launched products,” said Allison Santarossa, Daltile architectural representative. “It was really exciting to see the very positive reaction the commercial design community had to our new products.”

The Daltile Chicago gallery is one of the 35 Daltile Design Galleries, Daltile Design Studios and Daltile Design Service Centers located across the United States. Considered an integral part of the brand’s success, these Daltile showrooms give interior designers, architects and curious homeowners a chance to explore Daltile collections in-person. Daltile design consultants are always on-hand to help architecture and design professionals as well as their clients select the best Daltile product for every project.

 

 

Posted on

Daltile names 2016 Interior Design Scholarship winner

img_5023DallasDaltile, in partnership with the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) Foundation, named Kristina Tribell winner of the fifth annual Daltile Interior Design Scholarship. During NeoCon East 2016 in Philadelphia, Tribell was presented with a $10,000 scholarship to continue her education in the field of interior design.

This year’s design challenge, titled “Design Inspired by Nature,” was to redesign a hotel lobby using key biophilic design principles, demonstrating how thoughtful design, creativity, and Daltile products can come together to create a beautiful, welcoming, and impactful space.

Tribell chose the Hyatt Regency Hotel in downtown Houston as her project location, redesigning the lobby to incorporate biophilic influences. Using Daltile collections, including Marble Attaché and Saddle Brook Glazed Porcelain, Tribell reinvented the space to be more calming, a stark contrast from the bustling city outside of the hotel lobby doors.

daltilesamplesday1-4The grand prize winner and three finalists were selected by Daltile and the ASID Foundation with the help of a panel of industry experts. This year’s top scholarship recipients are:

  • Grand Prize ($10,000 scholarship): Kristina Tribell, The Art Institute of Houston
  • First Prize ($2,500 scholarship): Ali Guymon, Utah State University
  • Second Prize ($2,500 scholarship): Ben Roghaar, Utah State University
  • Third Prize ($2,500 scholarship): Charlotte Jolly, Indiana University

New for 2016, Daltile and the ASID Foundation awarded the school or university with the highest number of completed entries with a $10,000 grant for their interior design program. This year, Utah State University was presented with the grant and had 37 students from the university submit projects for consideration.

For more information, visit www.daltile.com.

Posted on

Natural stone poised for mainstream move

October 24/31, 2016: Volume 31, Number 10
By Ken Ryan

screen-shot-2016-10-31-at-3-57-30-pm Flooring retailers searching for new revenue streams may need to look back a few centuries for the next great opportunity—natural stone. Executives tout natural stone as a product that brings the colors and texture of nature to homes while adding a quality and warmth to a room that proponents say is not possible with any other material.

“As a natural product it creates a look that is truly unique and can’t be fully replicated with products made to look like natural stone,” said Bob Baldocchi, chief marketing officer/vice president, sales support for Emser Tile.

With stone sales projected to move to the mid to higher-end markets, flooring retailers have the opportunity to profit from not just a flooring product but also countertops, wall tile and decorative mosaics. “As technology continues to advance, we will see increased creativity with stone mosaics,” said Roy Viana, director of natural stone and slab for Daltile. “The increased demand for textured mosaics has helped drive the advancement to three-dimensional tile, which adds depth and character to any room.”

Stone—perhaps because it is a natural material—has spooked some dealers from taking on the category. But that is one of the misconceptions that heretofore have kept stone from being a truly mainstream flooring category. Baldocchi said one of the biggest myths is stone is difficult to sell or explain. “Shown correctly, stone sells itself.”

Viana believes it is important for flooring retailers to continue to educate customers on the maintenance and application of natural stone. “Many home improvement shows feature stone or stone-look products throughout renovations, driving requests for the product,” he explained. “However, it is important that customers are aware of the inherent nature of stone and the upkeep. Proper maintenance of stone will ensure that their investment lasts.”

New developments
screen-shot-2016-10-31-at-3-59-55-pm
As with other flooring surfaces, stone formats are moving away from small and square to large and rectangular. As stone processing continues to improve and become more efficient at both the quarry and factory levels, costs are expected to continue to fall, making natural stone more of a consideration for the end users with a modest budget.

“Additionally, these improvements are enabling us to offer more stones in larger formats, such as 8 x 36 planks or 18 x 36, which used to either be a challenge or was in limited supply,” Viana said. “The natural stone industry continues to reinvent itself through new stones, finishes and formats in all categories, with a larger focus in limestone and marble products.” Daltile’s new One Quartz collection, comprising 93% natural quartz stone, combines the look of quartz with modern technology to provide a distinctive looking, durable surface.

M S International, a leader in the stone and slab space, recently added 12 new natural colors to its Stacked Stone collection. Two items, Calacatta Cressa 3D Honed and Statuarietto Capri 3D Honed, achieve the on-trend look of Italian white marble, which is gaining popularity.

Posted on

Daltile announces 5th annual Interior Design Scholarship

Screen Shot 2016-08-15 at 10.26.30 AMDallas–Daltile announced its fifth annual Interior Design Scholarship, presented by the ASID Foundation, is now open for submissions.

The 2016 contest challenges students to redesign an existing hotel lobby using key biophilic design principles to address and enhance the guest experience. Daltile said biophilia is the concept that people have an inherent desire to connect with nature and natural systems, highlighting the relationship between nature, human biology and the design of the built environment. The principles of biophilic design gives designers the guidance to design spaces that positively impact occupants’ health, productivity, creativity and wellbeing.

Undergraduate interior design students from all over the country are encouraged to enter this year’s contest, which will award $27,500 in scholarships. The grand prize winner will receive $10,000 towards their education, and three runners-up will each receive $2,500. New this year, the school with the highest number of completed student submissions will be awarded a $10,000 grant.

Students can enter their submissions until Sept. 22, 2016. The winner will be announced on Nov. 10, 2016, at the ASID Career Exchange at NeoCon East in Philadelphia. For more details, visit www.daltiledesign.com.

 

Posted on

New digs for Daltile showrooms in Las Vegas, Denver

Daltile announces the reopening of two recently remodeled showrooms in Denver and Las Vegas. The goal was to provide a single-source resource for local architecture and design communities.

“We wanted to create inviting spaces that inspire our customers,” said Corinthia Runge, manager of gallery and showroom operations for Daltile. “Our new locations were designed by designers, for designers, making it easy to imagine what is possible in any space.”

The 5,800-square-foot tile and stone gallery in Las Vegas—located at 3345 W. Sunset Road, Suite G—boasts a floor-to-ceiling desert cactus mosaic mural that reflects the surrounding location. Products are artfully displayed on floors, walls and partitions while a loose tile library provides customers with full-size samples to help match and coordinate styles for their projects. In addition, an LCD touch screen lets customers virtually flip through the digital catalog, view inspiration gallery images and build out designs with the tile and stone visualizer tool.

The Denver showroom—located at 852 S. Jason St., Unit 8— features an entry area with a large stone slab desk with waterfall accent that provides a focal point for visitors. The 4,700-square-foot tile and stone showroom also has a fireplace vignette featuring four book-matched slabs, while an adjacent slab-yard and neighboring Mohawk carpet showroom creates a holistic experience.

In the new Daltile Las Vegas showroom, products are artfully displayed on floors, walls and partitions while a loose tile library provides customers with full-size samples
In the new Daltile Las Vegas showroom, products are artfully displayed on floors, walls and partitions while a loose tile library provides customers with full-size samples
The 4,700-square-foot tile and stone showroom in Denver features an entry area with a large stone slab desk with waterfall accent.
The 4,700-square-foot tile and stone showroom in Denver features an entry area with a large stone slab desk with waterfall accent.