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Al’s column: Sometimes disagreement is healthy

June 10/17, 2019: Volume 34, Issue 26

By Lou Morano

 

(Editor’s note: This is the second installment in a multi-part series.)

If you want to be truly successful, make minimal mistakes and make more “right” choices, then this point is of colossal importance: Surround yourself with people who are not afraid to challenge you.

I never understood why owners of companies surround them- selves with “yes” men or with people who think exactly like them. Don’t get me wrong: It is very important to align yourself with people who have the same vision, ethics and goals for your company. But you must do it with people who have strengths in areas you are not strong in and think differently.

Case in point: Steve Cosentino, the vice president of my company, and Rodney DiFranco, my general manager, have been working with me for more than 32 years; we all think differently but have the same goals. When it comes to making decisions, the three of us usually make them together. We look at situations from different viewpoints, but we have the same goal in mind.

For example, Steve is very detail oriented and meticulous. When we implement a new system or process, he thinks of every single step, creating fail-safes along the way. Meanwhile, Rodney knows the installation end of our business and the sales process extremely well. His greatest strength is in the mechanics of things and how to physically get things done and in what order. My strengths lie in leadership. I am also very good at creating, maintaining and nurturing relationships. I know how to get things done and how to keep people on task and motivated.

When we address serious projects, problems, situations, etc., we discuss it together. We don’t always agree on everything, and we all have good points.

When we encounter situations where we are all not in agreement, the majority rules—even when I am not in the majority. Do we make the right decision 100% of the time? Of course not. However, over the years we made the right decision by an overwhelmingly large majority of the time than if we had just gone with my decisions when I was not in the majority. You need to trust and respect the people around you. More importantly, you have to trust the process. In my case, three heads are better than one.

As an example, many years ago, when we became a Mohawk Floorscapes dealer, we went to all five of our showrooms and made some very hard decisions on completely renovating and remerchandising our showrooms. There were five of us making the decisions, and I valued everyone’s opinion as much as mine. And more than once I strongly disagreed with the majority. I remember the Mohawk representative telling me, “Lou, you’re the owner, so if you want it your way it is your decision.” My reply was, “No, I am not so arrogant that I think I know better than all of you put together, and I truly respect all your opinions. If I can’t convince the majority to agree with me, then I know by going with the majority we will make the right decision more times than not.”

After all the stores were completely renovated, we could see that statement was very true. We made almost no mistakes, and for sure my decision to stick with the “majority rules” vote was the right decision. I can count on one hand how many times over 33 years owning my company that I went against the majority. In those few instances I have been right and wrong. However, we have made more right decisions because I trust and value the opinions of those around me, and our company is more successful because of it.

 

Lou Morano started selling carpet for a major retailer at the age of 19 in 1981. In 1985 he and his father incorporated Capitol Carpet, Inc., and opened their first full-service retail store in 1986. Today Morano operates five retail stores, including a commercial division, under the name Capitol Carpet & Tile and Window Fashions