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Ceramics: Functionality, style drive TISE 2019 tile introductions

March 4/11, 2019: Volume 34, Issue 20

By Megan Salzano

 

Las Vegas—While the tile and stone category has its challenges—think price points and installation—its evolution within the home has helped drive sales and the category’s overall value. No longer are consumers relegating tile and stone to kitchen and bath builds, they are looking to the category to support evolving home design trends such as decorative wall features, indoor/outdoor living and minimalistic design.

To fulfill these needs, tile manufacturers at this year’s Surfaces event showcased new collections that support 2019’s top design trends.

Indoor meets outdoor
Tile has wound its way across different surfaces within the home, but now it’s venturing outside as well. Manufacturers at the show were more than happy to oblige the current trend with new product collections boasting outdoor-rated products with matching indoor styles. Manufacturers were also quick to remind retailers of the growth opportunities this new trend is poised to bring.

MSI, for example, launched three indoor tile lines with coordinating outdoor pavers. “This is a whole new area, and we are trying to help the retailers see the opportunity,” said Manny Llerena, director of sales and marketing, MSI. “They traditionally think the outside is for the landscapers. We are telling them not anymore; not with porcelain. That really belongs to you now when you can connect the indoor to the outdoor.”

Some manufacturers added that while indoor tile may sell for $4 per square foot, outdoor tile may sell for twice as much. “It’s a great earning opportunity for the retailer,” Llerena added. “We think this is something that is going to really take hold and continue to grow, and we want to help them bring it along.”

‘Wood’ you look at that
When it comes to trending design, tile manufacturers agree wood looks are major sellers. What began just a few years ago as a nuanced style born out of advancing printing technologies has evolved into a full-fledged force to be reckoned with. With those advances in technology came not only the look of wood, but now the feel of hand-scraped or natural knots replicated on plank styles both large and small. This year, Emser tapped that technology to an even greater extent and partnered with Gensler to introduce its Yakedo collection.

“Wood looks are still an important part of the business, you can’t get away from it,” said Bob Baldocchi, chief marketing officer, Emser Tile. “So, what we do now is look at new technologies, new techniques—different sizes, textured feels, the right color blends and price points. Yakedo is a really special product for us. It’s based on the Shou Sugi Ban technique. They take hardwood, burn it and then install it, and it gives it a certain dimension, texture and strength. We’ve set up different lines of the manufacturing processes because we know these different looks are important.”

Black and blue
When it comes to trending colors within the tile category, manufacturers agree that both black and blue are beginning to reign. However, even wood-look planks with stark black colorways are growing in popularity. In addition, manufacturers agreed black and blue colorways are shifting from just a trend to an applied trend, with consumers and designers using a stark black shade within their applications instead of just admiring its possibilities.

“The black falls under the dark interiors trend—art deco, Victorian, gothic atmospheres and minimalistic design,” said Laura Grilli, senior product development manager, Daltile. “We are definitely starting to see these dark colors; and this is the inspiration behind Geometric Fusion.”

Daltile’s Geometric Fusion features nine patterns designed to be installed randomly, which creates an intentional deconstructed, geometric look. Each tile features a decorative blend of metallic, matte and glossy finishes. It’s available in four distinct colors, including a stark black called Obsidian.

Concrete ideas
One product trend show attendees were certain to notice was the focus on concrete looks within the tile category. Manufacturers big and small launched traditional concrete looks in square sizes while others incorporated terrazzo looks. Other suppliers stepped outside of the box with planks.

Crossville, for example, launched its Reformation collection at the show. “The name Reformation came from reforming your thinking about what concrete should be,” said Lindsey Waldrep, vice president of marketing. “When we started to consider doing a concrete plank so many people [thought], ‘But concrete comes in a square, it should be a square.’ But who said it has to be a square? Why don’t we think outside the box and do something a little different? Now that we’ve done it, people are in love with it. We have 24 x 36, 6 x 36 and 12 x 36 in the four colors—warm and cool neutrals, and I love the dark colors.”